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Household Robot Jibo Nets Over $1 Million On Indiegogo

Slashdot - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 11:22am
mikejuk (1801200) writes After seven days the Jibo project has over $1.1 million. What is surprising is that Jibo isn't a complex piece of hardware that will do the dishes and pick up clothes. It doesn't move around at all. It just sits and interacts with the family using a camera, microphones and a voice. It is a social robot, the speciality of the founder, MIT's, Cynthia Breazeal. The idea is that this robot will be your friend, take photos, remind you of appointments, order takeaway and tell the kids a story. If you watch the promo video then you can't help but think that this is all too polished and the real thing will fall flat on its face when delivered. If it does work then worry about the hundreds of kids needing psychiatric counselling — shades of Robbie in I, Robot. Even if it is hopelessly hyped — there is a development system and I want one. It is the early days of the home computer all over again.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Private Data On iOS Devices Not So Private After All

Slashdot - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 10:24am
theshowmecanuck (703852) writes with this excerpt from Reuters summarizing the upshot of a talk that Jonathan Zdziarski gave at last weekend's HOPE conference: Personal data including text messages, contact lists and photos can be extracted from iPhones through previously unpublicized techniques by Apple Inc employees, the company acknowledged this week. The same techniques to circumvent backup encryption could be used by law enforcement or others with access to the 'trusted' computers to which the devices have been connected, according to the security expert who prompted Apple's admission. Users are not notified that the services are running and cannot disable them, Zdziarski said. There is no way for iPhone users to know what computers have previously been granted trusted status via the backup process or block future connections. If you'd rather watch and listen, Zdziarski has posted a video showing how it's done.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Soccer Superstar Plays With Very Low Brain Activity

Slashdot - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 9:27am
jones_supa (887896) writes "Brazilian superstar Neymar's (Neymar da Silva Santos Júnior) brain activity while dancing past opponents is less than 10 per cent the level of amateur players, suggesting he plays as if on "auto-pilot", according to Japanese neurologists Eiichi Naito and Satoshi Hirose. The findings were published in the Swiss journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience following a series of motor skills tests carried out on the 22-year-old Neymar and several other athletes in Barcelona in February this year. Three Spanish second-division footballers and two top-level swimmers were also subjected to the same tests. Researcher Naito told Japan's Mainichi Shimbun newspaper: "Reduced brain activity means less burden which allows [the player] to perform many complex movements at once. We believe this gives him the ability to execute his various shimmies." In the research paper Naito concluded that the test results "provide valuable evidence that the football brain of Neymar recruits very limited neural resources in the motor-cortical foot regions during foot movements"."

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Max Levchin's latest: Homer, a creepily intimate look at what apps your friends use (Carmel DeAmicis/Gigaom)

TechMeme - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 9:25am

Carmel DeAmicis / Gigaom:
Max Levchin's latest: Homer, a creepily intimate look at what apps your friends use  —  Max Levchin's latest product, Homer, lets you see your friends' phone screens to discover new apps.  It also unwittingly provides a fascinating window into their lives.  —  My gchat pinged.  “Why do you have Glow?

Categories: Technology

Resistant “Nightmare Bacteria” Increase Five-Fold in Southeastern U.S.

Wired - Top Stories - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 9:10am
There’s worrisome news here in the southeastern US, buried in a journal that is favorite reading only for superbug geeks like me. The rate at which hospitals are recognizing cases of CRE — the form of antibiotic resistance that is so serious the CDC dubbed it a “nightmare” — rose five times over between 2008 […]






Categories: Open Source, Technology

Enraged Verizon FiOS Customer Seemingly Demonstrates Netflix Throttling

Slashdot - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 8:29am
MojoKid (1002251) writes The ongoing battle between Netflix and ISPs that can't seem to handle the streaming video service's traffic, boiled over to an infuriating level for Colin Nederkoon, a startup CEO who resides in New York City. Rather than accept excuses and finger pointing from either side, Nederkoon did a little investigating into why he was receiving such slow Netflix streams on his Verizon FiOS connection. What he discovered is that there appears to be a clear culprit. Nederkoon pays for Internet service that promises 75Mbps downstream and 35Mbps upstream through his FiOS connection. However, his Netflix video streams were limping along at just 375kbps (0.375mbps), equivalent to 0.5 percent of the speed he's paying for. On a hunch, he decided to connect to a VPN service, which in theory should actually make things slower since it's adding extra hops. Speeds didn't get slower, they got much faster. After connecting to VyprVPN, his Netflix connection suddenly jumped to 3000kbps, the fastest the streaming service allows and around 10 times faster than when connecting directly with Verizon. Verizon may have a different explanation as to why Nederkoon's Netflix streams suddenly sped up, but in the meantime, it would appear that throttling shenanigans are taking place. It seems that by using a VPN, Verizon simply doesn't know which packets to throttle, hence the gross disparity in speed.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Why Doesn't Facebook Want to Brag About Its Billion-Dollar App Ad Business? (Peter Kafka/Re/code)

TechMeme - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 7:20am

Peter Kafka / Re/code:
Why Doesn't Facebook Want to Brag About Its Billion-Dollar App Ad Business?  —  Did you think that Facebook's amazing mobile ad story — mobile was a big, troublesome zero two years ago, and 62 percent of the company's ad revenue yesterday — was fueled by app install ads?

Categories: Technology

The Hard-Core Fanatics Who Make Comic-Con So Great

Wired - Top Stories - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 6:36am
The average Comic-Con attendee isn't camping overnight for a Hall H seat or hauling around a 50-lb photon pack--they're taking in the sights and sounds of their favorite event.






Categories: Open Source, Technology

Day One With the Brand New Oculus Rift DK2: the Good, the Ugly and the Games

Slashdot - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 6:34am
muterobert (2927951) writes Paul James goes hands on with one of the first next-gen Oculus Rifts in the wild: "After much hacking (and some kind developer linkage) I stepped into a DK2 enabled version of Technolust and lost myself utterly! The stunning attention to detail, neon on black really lets the OLED panel shine here. In fact, this experience was the closest I think I've ever some to presence in virtual reality thus far. Leaning in to check the myriad retro objects, gawking at the lighting and just generally being blown away by the experience. This game was fabulous on the DK1, it's utterly compelling now."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

With photo-based key-copying services like KeyMe, simply allowing others to view your keys poses a security problem (Andy Greenberg/Wired)

TechMeme - Sat, 07/26/2014 - 5:15am

Andy Greenberg / Wired:
With photo-based key-copying services like KeyMe, simply allowing others to view your keys poses a security problem  —  The App I Used to Break Into My Neighbor's Home  —  When I broke into my neighbor's home earlier this week, I didn't use any cat burglar skills.  I don't know how to pick locks.

Categories: Technology