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Prepare All Your Tears for the Danish Girl Trailer

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 2:38pm

Get ready for heartbreak. And Oscar buzz.

The post Prepare All Your Tears for the Danish Girl Trailer appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Bugs In Belkin Routers Allow DNS Spoofing, Credential Theft

Slashdot - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 2:30pm
Trailrunner7 writes: The CERT/CC is warning users that some Belkin home routers contain a number of vulnerabilities that could allow an attacker to spoof DNS responses, intercept credentials sent in cleartext, access the web management interface, and take other actions on vulnerable routers. The vulnerabilities affect the Belkin N600 DB Wireless Dual Band N+ router, model F9K1102 v2 with firmware version 2.10.17, and potentially earlier versions of the firmware, as well. The vulnerabilities have not been patched by Belkin, the advisory from the CERT/CC says there aren't any practical workarounds for them. "DNS queries originating from the Belkin N600, such as those to resolve the names of firmware update and NTP servers, use predictable TXIDs that start at 0x0002 and increase incrementally. An attacker with the ability to spoof DNS responses can cause the router to contact incorrect or malicious hosts under the attacker's control," the advisory says.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Halo 5’s Intro Is Full of Spectacle and Fan Service

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 1:52pm

Microsoft has released a new trailer for Halo 5: Guardians this morning, showcasing what appears to be the upcoming game's opening cinematic.

The post Halo 5’s Intro Is Full of Spectacle and Fan Service appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Ask Slashdot: Can Any Wireless Tech Challenge Fiber To the Home?

Slashdot - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 1:49pm
New submitter danielmorrison writes: In Holland, MI (birthplace of Slashdot) we're working toward fiber to the home. A handful of people have asked why not go wireless instead? I know my reasons (speed, privacy, and we have an existing fiber loop) but are any wireless technologies good enough that cities should consider them? If so, what technologies and what cities have had success stories?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

The Russian Town Where Startling Pollution Is a Way of Life

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 1:30pm

Pollution has spawned horrific health problems among the town's 13,000 inhabitants. An Italian photographer went inside to share a story few have ever heard.

The post The Russian Town Where Startling Pollution Is a Way of Life appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Ecuador Considered Smuggling Julian Assange to Freedom in a Bag

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 1:30pm

Leaked documents detail a collection of failed schemes to get the long-trapped WikiLeaker out of London.

The post Ecuador Considered Smuggling Julian Assange to Freedom in a Bag appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

The Nicki Minaj and Miley Cyrus Beef Explained with Emojis

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 1:29pm

Courtesy of Jimmy Kimmel, here is a breakdown of the Nicki Minaj and Miley Cyrus spat using emoji.

The post The Nicki Minaj and Miley Cyrus Beef Explained with Emojis appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Stephen Colbert is the Newest Voice of Waze

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 1:07pm

For the next three weeks, anyway.

The post Stephen Colbert is the Newest Voice of Waze appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Citi Report: Slowing Global Warming Could Save Tens of Trillions of Dollars

Slashdot - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 1:02pm
Layzej writes with news carried by The Guardian about a report published by the Global Perspectives & Solutions division of Citibank (America's third-largest bank) examining the costs and benefits of a low-carbon future. The report examined two hypothetical futures: one "business as usual," and the other (the "Action" scenario) which includes an aggressive move to reduce energy use and carbon emission. From the article: "One of the most interesting findings in the report is that the investment costs for the two scenarios are almost identical. In fact, because of savings due to reduced fuel costs and increased energy efficiency, the Action scenario is actually a bit cheaper than the Inaction scenario. Coupled with the fact the total spend is similar under both action and inaction, yet the potential liabilities of inaction are enormous, it is hard to argue against a path of action." But there will be winners and losers, says the report: "The biggest loser stands to be the coal industry, where we estimate cumulative spend under our Action scenario could be $11.6 trillion less than in our Inaction scenario over the next quarter century, with renewables, wind and nuclear (as well as energy efficiency) the main beneficiaries."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

This Ebola Documentary Shows VR Film’s Radical Potential

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 1:00pm

The immediacy of the 360-degree view gives the film a poignancy that a news report simply can’t.

The post This Ebola Documentary Shows VR Film’s Radical Potential appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Humans Made Chickens Look Ridiculous. Really Ridiculous

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 12:35pm

Out today is Poultry Suite, a stunning photo book that catalogs some seriously impressive chicken breeds.

The post Humans Made Chickens Look Ridiculous. Really Ridiculous appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Windows 10 Grabs 5.21% Market Share, Passing Windows Vista and Windows 8

Slashdot - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 12:23pm
An anonymous reader writes: The effects of a free upgrade to Windows 10 are starting to trickle in. Available for just over a month, Windows 10 has now captured more than 5 percent market share, according to the latest figures from Net Applications. In just four weeks, Windows 10 has already been installed on over 75 million PCs. Microsoft is aiming to have 1 billion devices running Windows 10 "in two to three years," though that includes not just PCs, but smartphones, consoles, and other devices as well.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Google’s Alphabet: It’s All About Getting New Ideas Into Orbit

ReadWriteWeb - Tue, 09/01/2015 - 10:00am

Guest author Christopher Lochhead is a cofounding partner of Play Bigger Advisors. He wrote this post with his partners Al Ramadan and Dave Peterson.

“Gravity is working against me. And gravity wants to bring me down.” —John Mayer 

Asking why Google created Alphabet is the wrong question.

The right questions to ask are: Why did Google miss social networking? How is it that limo company Carey didn’t see the opportunity in smartphone-powered transportation and Uber's founders did? Why did it take SAP until 2011 to get into cloud apps, twelve years after the founding of Salesforce.com? And how come most of the innovation in technology security is coming from startups and not Symantec, McAfee, or Bluecoat?

Existing Markets Have Gravitational Pull

We believe the answer to these questions lie in what might be the most powerful force in business—the gravitational pull of existing markets. Gravity drags executives of existing businesses toward perfectly rationale decisions like listening to customers, meeting salespeople's requests, responding to competitors’ moves, and thinking about new features for current products.

Managers tasked with competing for market share in known categories don't question these priorities. But it turns out they are death when it comes to inventing new products, business models and market categories.

Eddie Yoon, a principal with The Cambridge Group, a consulting firm, in a landmark article for the Harvard Business Review, writes:

… category creation is the exception for large companies, not the rule. According to data in Nielsen’s Breakthrough Innovation Report, only 13% of the world’s leading consumer product companies introduced a breakthrough innovation from 2008 to 2010. Although large companies have the resources, capabilities, and growth aspirations to drive category creation, many market leaders merely sit on the sidelines watching new entrants create breakthrough products and business models.

Managing Versus Creating

The Google search business is one of the greatest technology Category Kings of all time. The search business unit is responsible for almost all of Google’s $66 billion in revenue. ComScore says Google has 67 percent market share and the space is growing at an annual rate of 26 percent At most large companies like Google, executives focus on managing and growing existing businesses. In a lot of ways they get paid to not screw up. Clearly, for Google, the smart thing to do is milk this cash cow forever.

The only problem—a legendarily awesome, high-class problem—is what about all of the new innovation Google wants to do? The gravitational pull of the search business inside Google is surely massive. 

In the blog post announcing the change to Alphabet, CEO Larry Page wrote that his cofounder “Sergey [Brin] and I are seriously in the business of starting new things.” 

If you take Larry at his word, he and Brin are decoupling managing the “as-is” business from creating “to-be” businesses. It is likely that entrepreneurially minded executives inside Google had become trapped by the inertial force of the search business. Gravity-bound executives work 80 hours a week doing business reviews, responding to customer demands, flying around hell's half-acre on sales calls, meeting with investors, and so on. That's required to run a successful operation.

The downside is that people “tinkering” on new stuff can seem irritating to executives focused on the core business. A good example of this is the troubled state of Google Now, which is falling behind competing offerings from Apple and Microsoft. Those charged with building the next great business simply don’t get much time, attention, or funding. This gravity dynamic can make it meaningfully harder for the people designing new products, business models, and categories to succeed, especially if they are competing with startups who are solely focused on new category potential. 

If any of this was the case inside Google, devising a strategy to cultivate innovation, while preserving the core business would be smart.

Rocking Out To The Next Wave Of Change

Like the '80s rock bands who used to play stadiums and now headline county fairs—any Loverboy fans still around?—the technology industry is littered with elderly Category Kings who cease to create breakthrough products and categories and lose relevancy over time. Page and Brin are clearly trying to avoid this fate.

In this context, Alphabet can be seen as a way to break the newer parts free from the gravity of the colossal search business, increasing their odds of independent success. Nest, led by the entrepreneurial CEO Tony Fadell, is a clear example.

If it works, Google could become a Category Kingmaker, while growing the core Google business at the same time. If that happens, we'll be talking about Google for decades to come. If it doesn't—well, there are always those county fairs.

Photo by Philip Cohen

Categories: Technology