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Big Question: Why Am I a Horrible Person When I Drive?

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 1:15pm

Road rage begins to make sense when you look at it through the lens of behavioral science.

The post Big Question: Why Am I a Horrible Person When I Drive? appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

Are Only Humans Rightly Free? The Case for Animal Rights

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 1:07pm

Ahead of a possibly history ruling tomorrow, a lawyer, a philosopher and a research scientist passionately explain why animals deserve the right to bodily freedom.

The post Are Only Humans Rightly Free? The Case for Animal Rights appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

Peter Singer: There Is No Good Reason to Keep Apes in Prison

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 12:53pm

When Justice Jaffe issues her ruling tomorrow, we know the full significance of the order she has issued. But one day, surely, we will recognize that there is no good reason to keep apes in prison, nor to deny them basic rights.

The post Peter Singer: There Is No Good Reason to Keep Apes in Prison appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

All Animals Have Rights: A Researcher’s Perspective

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 12:47pm

Because animals do not have a voice with which to express their rights and confront those who would deny them, then research must elucidate their needs and speak on their behalf.

The post All Animals Have Rights: A Researcher’s Perspective appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

Hyundai Now Offers an Android Car, Even For Current Owners

Slashdot - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 12:45pm
An anonymous reader writes: Looking more like a computer company than a car company, Hyundai ships Android Auto on 2015 Sonatas and unlocks it for owners of the 2015 Sonata with a software update. Says the article: To enable Android Auto, existing 2015 Hyundai Sonata owners outfitted with the Navigation feature can download an update to a USB drive, plug it into the car's USB port, and rewrite the software installed in the factory on the head-unit. When the smartphone is plugged into the head-unit with a USB cable, the user is prompted to download Android Auto along with mobile apps. Android Auto requires Android 5.0 or above. That sounds like a good description of how I'd like my car's head unit to work -- and for that matter, I'd like access to all of the software.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

It's Official: Microsoft's Cortana Is Coming To iOS And Android

ReadWriteWeb - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 12:42pm

The rumors were true: Microsoft has confirmed that Cortana is coming to iOS and Android later this year. Most of the voice assistant's functionality will be available on Apple and Google's platforms, though users won't be able to launch apps or toggle settings as they can on Windows Phone.

For anyone with more than a passing interest in Microsoft's journey under CEO Satya Nadella, the move won't be a surprise. The Redmond firm has been busy focusing on getting its mobile apps available on all platforms (such as its flagship Office suite), and making Windows 10 work better across computers, smartphones, tablets and even game consoles. 

See also: Google Now’s Open API Plans Could Spell Trouble for Siri And Cortana

The new Cortana releases tie into a newly unveiled Phone Assistant app for Windows 10, which aims to make using the desktop software with iOS and Android devices easier. 

Cortana Grows Up And Moves Out

To take on Google Now and Apple's Siri, Microsoft has been focusing on Cortana as an integral part of the Windows 10 operating system (OS), due to arrive this summer. The company wants to offer ubiquitous access, so it plans on bringing the assistant to desktops, laptops, the Xbox One, Windows 10 Mobile devices and even competing platforms. 

Cortana on iOS and Android will recognize who you are, sync your notebooks across devices, and display notifications about reminders and updates. You'll be able to tap into its search capabilities and access anything that's available in the cloud (like results from your favorite sports team). 

See also: Microsoft's Edge Will Let You Scribble On The Web—And That's Awesome

Aside from the ability to launch specific apps or toggle device settings with your voice (something Apple and Google doesn't allow), the experience will be much the same as it is on Windows Phone.  

The Android Cortana app is scheduled for a late June release with the iOS version following "later this year." We still don't have an official release date for Windows 10—July is a good bet—but once it arrives, it should come with decent iOS and Android compatibility out of the box.

Talking Strategy

Bringing Cortana to competing platforms looks directly opposed to Apple's strategy. (Good luck trying to get your Android or Windows Phone device talking happily to a Mac.) But it's a common sense approach when you've got a sliver of the mobile phone market—some 3.8 percent in the US according to the latest figures.

So far, Windows 10 looks like Microsoft's best shot at gaining ground, as a growing number of people seem intrigued enough to at least try out the preview version. The company obviously wants to attract new users, while giving the initiated a reason to stay.

As Google Chrome proves, getting your software on your competitors' platforms can bring some benefits. Microsoft is likely crossing its fingers, hoping that embracing iOS and Android will draw users towards Windows. But tech maker beware: At the same time, the strategy could backfire, ensuring Windows is less vital to Microsoft's overall success. 

Images courtesy of Microsoft

Categories: Technology

Why We Must Give Apes the Right to Bodily Liberty

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 12:30pm

For the first time, a court has decided that individual nonhuman animals are entitled to a hearing to determine whether they should be considered legal persons with the right to be free from unlawful detention. That hearing is tomorrow.

The post Why We Must Give Apes the Right to Bodily Liberty appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

Hot Topic To Buy ThinkGeek Parent Company Geeknet

Slashdot - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 12:01pm
jones_supa points out the news (also at Ars Technica, and -- paywalled -- at the Wall Street Journal) that clothing and music retailer Hot Topic has announced plans to buy Geeknet, parent company of ThinkGeek and ThinkGeek Solutions, for $117.3 million. ThinkGeek Solutions is a distributor of video-game themed merchandise through licensed web stores. Hot Topic Inc. will pay $17.50 per Geeknet share. Privately held Hot Topic, based in Los Angeles, has more than 650 stores in the U.S. and Canada. Geeknet will become a Hot Topic subsidiary. This news inspires some nostalgia here; ThinkGeek was for a long time one of Slashdot's sister sites under the umbrella of VA Linux, and I had some fun years back helping to set up the ThinkGeek booth at LinuxWorld in New York.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Is It Possible for Passengers to Hack Commercial Aircraft?

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 11:47am

Experts insist that what the FBI claims hacker Chris Roberts did on a flight is not possible. We examine why, and what is still unknown.

The post Is It Possible for Passengers to Hack Commercial Aircraft? appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

Computers Can’t Recognize These Wild Faces as Faces

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 9:00am

Two German designers capture the point at which computer vision software draws a blank.

The post Computers Can’t Recognize These Wild Faces as Faces appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

Tools For Screencasting On Your Windows Desktop

ReadWriteWeb - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 9:00am

Text and still images can document a computer process or describe software features well, but video can do so much more. With a screencast, you can capture that elusive bug which seems to disappear the moment anyone else looks at your screen, create stunning visual presentations of software or websites, and create tutorials.

See also: How To Capture The Action On Your Mac Desktop

I covered tips and advice for screencasting in a previous article, along with software for Mac OS X, but plenty of options also cater to Windows users at varying prices, from free to expensive. Read on to check out a few of my favorites below.  

TechSmith Camtasia Studio, Jing, and Snagit

TechSmith has a very diverse line of screencasting and capturing solutions, including Camtasia Studio, Jing, and Snagit.

Camtasia Studio ($299), TechSmith’s screencasting powerhouse, offers a powerful built-in video editor with a multi-track timeline, which makes it easy to layer multiple video, image, and audio media for a full-featured production. 

See also: Podcasting On A Budget: How To Record Great Audio For Less

Jing (free), also from TechSmith, targets users who want to share photos and screen recordings quickly and easily. Once you capture video of your screen, you can send it directly to Screencast.com or share it via IM, email, and social media. But bear in mind that Jing limits recordings to five minutes. That may be great for short tutorials and other concise captures, but it's not ideal if you need to record longer footage or long-form presentations.

Snagit ($50) got its start as an image capture and editing program, and those are still its primary features. But it also offers a very basic video editor that lets you to trim out bloopers. 

These programs either come free or offer trial downloads.

VLC Media Player

VideoLAN’s VLC media player (free) is an open-source virtual Swiss Army knife for video playback, recording, and streaming.

While it's best known for the ability to play videos with a wide range of file types, it also gives users the ability to stream and record their desktop, as well as other multimedia input devices in a variety of formats. 

But user beware: While testing VLC for this post, I experienced crashes using both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions of VLC 2.2.1 in Windows 8.1. I dug into some research, and this appears to be a known issue with the current version.

Screencast-O-Matic

If you want something another free, simple tool, check out Screencast-O-Matic. The Web-based screen recording program works for both Mac and Windows, and it only requires the installation of a small piece of software. Users of the free version can record up to 15 minutes of video with a small watermark, while pro users ($15/year) can record more than 15 minutes at a time. 

You will also need to upgrade to the pro version if you want to record system audio. Both free and pro users can narrate their screencast using their microphones, and publish directly to YouTube or export video in AVI, FLV, and MP4 file types. The program can also record the whole screen or a specific part of it, a feed from your webcam, or both. 

Open Broadcaster Software

Currently in beta testing, Open Broadcaster Software (free) looks like it could be one of the most impressive stand-alone programs for streaming and screen recording programs. It lets you stream your screen live to Twitch, YouTube, DailyMotion, Hitbox, and more. You can also record your screen directly to your hard drive in a range of file formats. 

One feature that sets it apart from many traditional screen recording programs is its GPU-based capture mechanism, which lets it to record gameplay without hammering your system. 

Fraps

Fraps is a long-time favorite among gamers. Built to capture video gameplay, it has a number of useful features for screencasting, including an overlay that displays your current frame rate and recording status. 

ShadowPlay

Nvidia’s GeForce ShadowPlay (free) makes it easy to record your screen whether you are at your desktop or embroiled in the latest video game. 

Desktop recording is only possible with desktop-class GPUs. For instance, if you are running it on a laptop with a mobile Nvidia GeForce graphics processor, you will only be able to record gameplay in DirectX 9, 10, and 11 games.

A stand-out feature in ShadowPlay is appropriately called shadow mode, which automatically records your gameplay for up to 20 minutes in the background. To export it and make sure you never miss the big play, just hit a hotkey combination. You can also easily stream directly from ShadowPlay to Twitch.tv.

Read the fine print before you use it, though. ShadowPlay only works with GeForce GTX 600, 700, 800, and 900 series cards, including its own mobile variant.

If you are an AMD graphics card user, you’re not out of luck. AMD teamed up with Raptr to create the AMD Gaming Evolved client, complete with its own in-game recording capabilities for owners of AMD Radeon HD 7000 series (GCN) and newer cards.

These are just a few of the large array of screen-recording options for Windows users, and they can help you immortalize your desktop behavior—whether you’re putting together a video tutorial or showing off your first-person shooting skills. Ultimately, your ideal solution depends a lot on what you're recording and why, so use the picks above as a starting point to run your own tests. Good luck! 

Lead photo by David Brown; Camtasia screenshot courtesy of TechSmith

Categories: Technology

Orphan Black GIF and a Graf: Alison Shakes What Cloning Gave Her

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 8:48am

Suburban clone Alison and her husband Donnie had the most fun Orphan Black has had in a while on this weekend's episode. (Underwear dancing!)

The post Orphan Black GIF and a Graf: Alison Shakes What Cloning Gave Her appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

End of the Year Comments for Students and Faculty

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 8:39am

Here are some thoughts for the end of the academic year including the importance of a 4.0 GPA.

The post End of the Year Comments for Students and Faculty appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

Android Auto: The First Great In-Car Infotainment System

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 8:00am

Android Auto, now available from Hyundai, is remarkable for its simplicity and flexibility.

The post Android Auto: The First Great In-Car Infotainment System appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology

With His New Novel, Paolo Bacigalupi Imagines an Arid Future

Wired - Top Stories - Tue, 05/26/2015 - 7:00am

Out today, 'The Water Knife' centers on a vicious fight over water rights in a near-future, desiccated American Southwest.

The post With His New Novel, Paolo Bacigalupi Imagines an Arid Future appeared first on WIRED.









Categories: Open Source, Technology