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The Scariest Thing About the New Sci-Fi Game Duskers? The Command Line

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 5:18pm
The new PC game "Duskers" holds you at a remove as you explore derelict ships for supplies and information. It's abstract, distant, and terrifying. The post The Scariest Thing About the New Sci-Fi Game Duskers? The Command Line appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

Source: Twitter curtails development of Buy button and product pages, moves commerce team to other projects (Alex Kantrowitz/BuzzFeed)

TechMeme - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 5:15pm

Alex Kantrowitz / BuzzFeed:
Source: Twitter curtails development of Buy button and product pages, moves commerce team to other projects  —  Jack Dorsey puts Dick Costolo-era project on backburner as Twitter refocuses on core product.  —  Twitter has curtailed product development on its ‘Buy’ button and product pages …

Categories: Technology

Google Built an Escape Room, Making People Use Its Apps To Get Out

Slashdot - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 4:55pm
An anonymous reader writes: Google France has built an escape room created by We Are Social, called "Premiere Piece," that will open in the heart of Paris. Adweek writes: "The campaign builds on the escape room trend, in which you and a bunch of friends pay to get locked in a room for an hour or two, left to solve puzzles and work in collaboration to find a way out. In 40 minutes, you must solve puzzles with help from apps like Search, Maps, Translate, Photos, Art and Culture and Cardboard, all of which are integrated into the gameplay. In Premiere Piece, visitors must help save a crew of digital artists locked in a workshop, so they can present their painstaking work at an art center in Paris. By working together, participants must unlock an object that completes their masterpiece." Google France was in the news recently for being raided by investigators for unpaid taxes.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

A Clever New Kind of Intersection Kicks Risky Left Turns to the Curb

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 4:45pm
The diverging diamond interchange is having a moment. The post A Clever New Kind of Intersection Kicks Risky Left Turns to the Curb appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

Who Needs a Modular Phone When You Can Have a Modular Case?

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 4:43pm
Otterbox made an Inspector Gadget for your iPhone. The post Who Needs a Modular Phone When You Can Have a Modular Case? appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

Former McDonald's USA CEO: $35K Robots Cheaper Than Hiring at $15 Per Hour

Slashdot - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 4:10pm
An anonymous reader shares an article on Fox Business: As fast-food workers across the country vie for $15 per hour wages, many business owners have already begun to take humans out of the picture. "I was at the National Restaurant Show yesterday and if you look at the robotic devices that are coming into the restaurant industry -- it's cheaper to buy a $35,000 robotic arm than it is to hire an employee who's inefficient making $15 an hour (warning: autoplaying video) bagging French fries -- it's nonsense and it's very destructive and it's inflationary and it's going to cause a job loss across this country like you're not going to believe," said former McDonald's USA CEO Ed Rensi during an interview on the FOX Business Network's Mornings with Maria. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1.3 million people earned the current minimum wage of $7.25 per hour with about 1.7 million having wages below the federal minimum in 2014. These three million workers combined made up 3.9 percent of all hourly paid workers.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

T-Mobile and Twilio pairing up to connect on IoT

ReadWriteWeb - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 4:00pm

Cloud communications platform Twilio has announced a new cellular network partnership with U.S. cellular giant T-Mobile, called Twilio Programmable Wireless, which will provide data, SMS, and voice communications to connected devices.

Announced at SIGNAL, a developer conference on communications, the partnership expands Twilio’s platform to devices outside of Wi-Fi range, which require constant Internet service. Devices like autonomous cars, drones, or even outdoor sensors that send information in real-time back to the server should be able to use T-Mobile’s cellular service.

Image Credit: Roy Andrew Ng

See Also: Miniature IoT sensor has five little superpowers

T-Mobile will provide SIM cards at $2 a month, per connected device. That fits with the usual rate that other machine-to-machine (M2M) networks are charging, like Vodafone and Hologram.

Data prices start at 10 cents per megabyte, though companies that require large pools of data can pay $25 for the first gigabyte and $15 for every gigabyte after that.

Twilio already has use cases prepared

Twilio provides a range of use cases for its cellular network, including the management of an autonomous car fleet, smartwatches that do not need a connected smartphone, and smart factory monitoring and automation.

“Modernizing communications and moving it into the realm of software has been Twilio’s mission from day one,” said Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson. “With enterprises needing to manage mobility more than ever before and the unrealized promise of IoT, there’s never been a better time to lift the barriers on cellular communications.”

T-Mobile has been surging in subscribers to its wireless network, recently passing Sprint to become the third largest provider in the United States. Part of the company’s success has been low profit margins, which has upset investors. This new partnership with Twilio might be a way to offset the low profits, by making large gains in the enterprise market.

They aren’t the first carrier to work on M2M communications, both AT&T and Verizon Wireless provide their own IoT services, but neither of them have partnered with a major IoT specialist to push cellular services into IoT and the smart home.

The post T-Mobile and Twilio pairing up to connect on IoT appeared first on ReadWrite.

Categories: Technology

Google To Bring Official Android Support To the Raspberry Pi 3

Slashdot - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 3:35pm
An anonymous reader shares an Ars Technica report: The Raspberry Pi 3 is not hurting for operating system choices. The tiny ARM computer is supported by several Linux distributions and even has a version of Windows 10 IoT core available. Now, it looks like the Pi is about to get official support for one of the most popular operating systems out there: Android. In Google's Android Open Source Project (AOSP) repository, a new device tree recently popped up for the Raspberry Pi 3. The AOSP device tree contains mostly Nexus devices with the occasional "generic" entry or developer board tossed into the mix. It's rare to see a non-Google device in AOSP, so it seems Google has taken quite a shine to the tiny computer. With officially supported source code, it should be much easier for hackers to get Android up and running on the Pi 3. And once that's done, you should be able to sideload more than 1.5 million apps onto the Pi to make the device do whatever you want.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Culture Podcast: Neighbors 2 Is a Strange New Kind of Feminist Movie

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 3:30pm
This week on the WIRED Culture podcast, we're answering the important questions. The post Culture Podcast: Neighbors 2 Is a Strange New Kind of Feminist Movie appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

Google Steps Up Pressure on Partners Tardy in Updating Android

Slashdot - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 3:10pm
Google is actively tracking the time its partner OEMs take to release a new version of Android onto their devices. According to a Bloomberg report, the company is drawing up rankings that could shame some phone makers into better behavior. From the report: Google shared this list with Android partners earlier this year. It has discussed making it public to highlight proactive manufacturers and shame tardy vendors through omission from the list, two of the people said. [...] Google is making progress persuading phone makers and carriers to install security updates quicker "for the good of users," Android chief Hiroshi Lockheimer said. The same expedited process may then be used to send operating system updates to phones, he explained. The most challenging discussions are with carriers, which can be slow to approve updates because they test them thoroughly to avoid network disruption. The report adds that several OEMs are also stepping up their game to better comply with Google's new wishes. Motorola, for instance, is working on offering quarterly updates to its three years old devices. For users with non-Nexus devices, it's really frustrating to wait for months, and in some cases, years, before their devices from Samsung, Xiaomi, Huawei, HTC and other manufacturers get upgraded to a newer version of Android. Another challenge for Google is to push its partners to actively release updates to affordable and mid-range smartphones. Many OEMs mostly worry about serving those users who have the flagship and high-end models.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Sri Lanka goes mega in smart city push

ReadWriteWeb - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 3:00pm

The south Asian island nation of Sri Lanka announced it is partnering with Siemens to transform its entire Western Province in one huge smart city.

As reported by Money Control Sri Lanka signed an agreement to gain smart city expertise from Siemens, the German engineering and technology giant. Siemens will be contributing its smart city expertise to help the government develop cost-efficient infrastructure and reduce congestion in the country’s Western Province.

Sri Lanka’s move comes as neighboring India recently ramped up efforts to transform many of its most populous urban areas into smart cities.

The Ministry of Megapolis and Western Development is the Sri Lankan state department tasked with developing a vast smart city that will become a commercial, aviation and naval hub for the Asian region over the next five years. The Megapolis Ministry, which sounds vaguely like an industrial band from the 1980s, plans to develop new cities in Bandaragama, Kadawatha, Kottawa and Kerawalapitiya as part of the initiative.

“We are… happy to partner with Siemens whose expertise and technologies will contribute to the Western Province’s intensive efforts to eliminate congestion pressure on urban infrastructure, services and environment with a focus on reducing the per unit capital cost of infrastructure,” said Lakshman Jayasekara of the Western Region Megapolis Planning Project in a statement.

Sri Lanka rebuilding after long civil war

Sri Lanka, an island nation off the coast of India with a population of 20 million, is in the process of rebuilding its economy after a debilitating 25-year civil war.

In its move to modernize Sri Lanka’s economy and cope with its rapid urbanization, the ministry is looking for smart city solutions to such issues as traffic, energy, environment, garbage, slums and livelihoods.

“With its global expertise, Siemens has the portfolio, the know-how, and the expertise to help cities become more livable, more competitive and more sustainable,” said Sunil Mathur, CEO of Siemens India. “This will enable the national economy to leverage the benefits of economies of agglomeration brought about by urbanization.”

The ministry will be involved primarily in macro-level planning of the Western Megapolis region, developing and implementing insight on bio-geophysical and socio-economic aspects.

The post Sri Lanka goes mega in smart city push appeared first on ReadWrite.

Categories: Technology

Foxconn replaces 60K factory workers with robots, denies that it means long-term job losses (BBC)

TechMeme - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 2:50pm

BBC:
Foxconn replaces 60K factory workers with robots, denies that it means long-term job losses  —  Apple and Samsung supplier Foxconn has reportedly replaced 60,000 factory workers with robots.  —  One factory has “reduced employee strength from 110,000 to 50,000 thanks to the introduction of robots” …

Categories: Technology

Microsoft Backtracks On 'Nasty Trick' Upgrade To Windows 10

Slashdot - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 2:30pm
Reader Raging Bool writes: Days after angering many users with its so-called "nasty trick", Microsoft has reversed its crazy decision to infuriate users by upgrading them to Windows 10 automatically. Users were angry that clicking the cross to dismiss the box meant that they had agreed to the upgrade. Based on "customer feedback", Microsoft said it would add another notification that provided customers with "an additional opportunity for cancelling the upgrade". Microsoft told the BBC it had modified the pop-up as a result of criticism: "We've added another notification that confirms the time of the scheduled upgrade and provides the customer an additional opportunity for cancelling or rescheduling the upgrade. If the customer wishes to continue with their upgrade at the designated time, they can click 'OK' or close the notifications with no further action needed."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

How on Earth Could a Juicer Cost $700? Because Yves Béhar

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 2:24pm
The goal, Béhar says, is to create a device that makes juicing so simple, it becomes part of your daily routine. The post How on Earth Could a Juicer Cost $700? Because Yves Béhar appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

Genius' Web Annotations Undermined Web Security

Slashdot - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 1:50pm
New reader BradyDale shares an article on the Verge: Until early May, when The Verge confidentially disclosed the results of my independent security tests, the "web annotator" service provided by the tech startup Genius had been routinely undermining a web browser security mechanism. The web annotator is a tool which essentially republishes web pages in order to let Genius users leave comments on specific passages. In the process of republishing, those annotated pages would be stripped of an optional security feature called the Content Security Policy, which was sometimes provided by the original version of the page. This meant that anyone who viewed a page with annotations enabled was potentially vulnerable to security exploits that would have been blocked by the original site. Though no specific victims have been identified, the potential scope of this bug was broad: it was applied to all Genius users, undermined any site with a Content Security Policy, and re-enabled all blocked JavaScript code. Vijith Assar dives deep into how Genius did this :The primary way Genius annotations are accessed on the web is by adding "genius.it" in front of any URL as a prefix. The genius.it server reads the original content behind the scenes, adds the annotations, and delivers the hybrid content. The Genius version of the page includes a few extra scripts and highlighted passages, but until recently it also eliminated the original page's Content Security Policy. The Content Security Policy is an optional set of instructions encoded in the header of the HTTP connection which tells browsers exactly which sites and servers should be considered safe -- any code which isn't from one of those sites can then be ignored.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Move Mountains and Carve Rivers in a Seriously Awesome AR Sandbox

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 05/25/2016 - 1:36pm
The best part of the video is when he makes it rain. The post Move Mountains and Carve Rivers in a Seriously Awesome AR Sandbox appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology