Technology

Oracle to announce it will offer its database and Java in the cloud, taking on Microsoft Azure (Arik Hesseldahl/Re/code)

TechMeme - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 2:20pm

Arik Hesseldahl / Re/code:
Oracle to announce it will offer its database and Java in the cloud, taking on Microsoft Azure  —  For Larry Ellison's Oracle, the Cloud Beckons  —  Business software giant Oracle kicks off its massive OpenWorld conference in San Francisco tonight with a keynote address by founder and newly named CTO Larry Ellison.

Categories: Technology

Nixie Wearable Drone Camera Flies Off Your Wrist

Slashdot - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 1:41pm
MojoKid writes Over the past couple of years, drones have become popular enough to the point where a new release doesn't excite most people. But Nixie is different. It's a drone that you wear, like a bracelet. Whenever you need to let it soar, you give it a command to unwrap, power it up, and let it go. From the consumer standpoint, the most popular use for drones is to capture some amazing footage. But what if you want to be in that footage? That's where Nixie comes in. After "setting your camera free", the drone soars around you, keeping you in its frame. Nixie is powered by Intel's Edison kit, which is both small enough and affordable enough to fit inside such a small device.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

The history of the "right to be forgotten", and a look inside Google's removal process (Jeffrey Toobin/New Yorker)

TechMeme - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 1:30pm

Jeffrey Toobin / New Yorker:
The history of the “right to be forgotten”, and a look inside Google's removal process  —  Google and the Right to Be Forgotten  —  In Europe, the right to be forgotten trumps the Internet. … “We should support the local farm as well as the local confectioner.”  —  »

Categories: Technology

The Physics of Space Battles

Slashdot - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 12:38pm
An anonymous reader writes PBS' It's OK to be Smart made this interesting video showing us what is and isn't physically realistic or possible in the space battles we've watched on TV and the movies. From the article: "You're probably aware that most sci-fi space battles aren't realistic. The original Star Wars' Death Star scene was based on a World War II movie, for example. But have you wondered what it would really be like to duke it out in the void? PBS is more than happy to explain in its latest It's Okay To Be Smart video. As you'll see below, Newtonian physics would dictate battles that are more like Asteroids than the latest summer blockbuster. You'd need to thrust every time you wanted to change direction, and projectiles would trump lasers (which can't focus at long distances); you wouldn't hear any sound, either."

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Google Chairman Eric Schmidt: Competition Between Apple and Google is More Brutal Than Ever (Juli Clover/MacRumors)

TechMeme - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 12:00pm

Juli Clover / MacRumors:
Google Chairman Eric Schmidt: Competition Between Apple and Google is More Brutal Than Ever  —  Google executive chairman Eric Schmidt and former SVP of products, Jonathan Rosenberg, recently published a new book entitled “How Google Works, which explores topics like corporate culture …

Categories: Technology

Ask Slashdot: Software Issue Tracking Transparency - Good Or Bad?

Slashdot - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 11:35am
First time accepted submitter Mike Sheen writes I'm the lead developer for an Australian ERP software outfit. For the last 10 years or so we've been using Bugzilla as our issue tracking system. I made this publicly available to the degree than anyone could search and view bugs. Our software is designed to be extensible and as such we have a number of 3rd party developers making customization and integrating with our core product. We've been pumping out builds and publishing them as "Development Stream (Experimental / Unstable" and "Release Stream (Stable)", and this is visible on our support site to all. We had been also providing a link next to each build with the text showing the number of bugs fixed and the number of enhancements introduced, and the URL would take them to the Bugzilla list of issues for that milestone which were of type bug or enhancement. This had been appreciated by our support and developer community, as they can readily see what issues are addressed and what new features have been introduced. Prior to us exposing our Bugzilla database publicly we produced a sanitized list of changes — which was time consuming to produce and I decided was unnecessary given we could just expose the "truth" with simple links to the Bugzilla search related to that milestone. The sales and marketing team didn't like this. Their argument is that competitors use this against us to paint us as producers of buggy software. I argue that transparency is good, and beneficial — and whilst our competitors don't publish such information — but if we were to follow our competitors practices we simply follow them in the race to the bottom in terms of software quality and opaqueness. In my opinion, transparency of software issues provides: Identification of which release or build a certain issue is fixed. Recognition that we are actively developing the software. Incentive to improve quality controls as our "dirty laundry" is on display. Information critical to 3rd party developers. A projection of integrity and honesty. I've yielded to the sales and marketing demands such that we no longer display the links next to each build for fixes and enhancements, and now publish "Development Stream (Experimental / Unstable" as simply "Development Stream") but I know what is coming next — a request to no longer make our Bugzilla database publicly accessible. I still have the Bugzilla database publicly exposed, but there is now only no longer the "click this link to see what we did in this build". A compromise may be to make the Bugzilla database only visible to vetted resellers and developers — but I'm resistant to making a closed "exclusive" culture. I value transparency and recognize the benefits. The sales team are insistent that exposing such detail is a bad thing for sales. I know by posting in a community like Slashdot that I'm going to get a lot of support for my views, but I'm also interested in what people think about the viewpoint that such transparency could be bad thing.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Over 30 Hikers Die During Ontake Eruption in Japan: What Happened?

Wired - Top Stories - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 11:17am

After yesterday’s news about the unexpected eruption at Ontake, we are finally getting the full, grim picture of the extent of death at the Japanese volcano. Authorities in the area has said that over 30 people have been found on the volcano and mostly of them are likely dead from effects of the eruption. This […]

The post Over 30 Hikers Die During Ontake Eruption in Japan: What Happened? appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

When Everything Works Like Your Cell Phone

Slashdot - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 10:32am
The Atlantic is running an article about how "smart" devices are starting to see everyday use in many people's home. The authors say this will fundamentally change the concept of what it means to own and control your possessions. Using smartphones as an example, they extrapolate this out to a future where many household items are dependent on software. Quoting: These phones come with all kinds of restrictions on their possible physical capabilities. You may not take them apart. Depending on the plan, not all software can be downloaded onto them, not every device can be tethered to them, and not every cell phone network can be tapped. "Owning" a phone is much more complex than owning a plunger. And if the big tech players building the wearable future, the Internet of things, self-driving cars, and anything else that links physical stuff to the network get their way, our relationship to ownership is about to undergo a wild transformation. They also suggest that planned obsolescence will become much more common. For example, take watches: a quality dumbwatch can last decades, but a smartwatch will be obsolete in a few years.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Update: At Least 31 People Feared Dead After Japan Volcano Erupts

Slashdot - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 9:28am
An anonymous reader writes "More than 30 people may be dead in a volcanic eruption in central Japan, the nation's second natural disaster in the past month. Nagano prefecture posted on its website that about 30 people had heart and lung failure, the customary way for Japanese authorities to describe a body until police doctors can examine it. At least four of the victims were being brought down from Mount Ontake on Sunday afternoon, one day after the volcano erupted."

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Ubuntu Touch For Phones Hits RTM, First Phones Coming This Year

Slashdot - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 8:22am
An anonymous reader writes: In early 2013, Canonical showed the world Ubuntu Touch, a version of Ubuntu developed specifically for smartphones. Now, the mobile operating system has finally reached "release to manufacturing" status. (Here's the release announcement.) The first phone running Ubuntu Touch, the Meizu MX4, will start shipping in December. "Details are scarce on its hardware, but a leak from iGeek suggests the Pro variant may have a Samsung Exynos 5430 processor, 4GB of RAM, and a 2560x1536 resolution screen. ... This more powerful hardware is good news if true, and it bodes well for Ubuntu's vision of computing convergence." Softpedia has a preview of the RTM version of the OS. They say performance has improved significantly, even on old phones, and that the UI has been polished into a much better state.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Microsoft Co-opts Ice Bucket Challenge Idea To Promote Coding In Latin America

Slashdot - Sun, 09/28/2014 - 5:18am
theodp writes: Microsoft is aiming to offer free programming courses to over a million young Latin Americans through its Yo Puedo Programar and Eu Posso Programar initiatives ("I Can Program"). People between the ages of 12 and 25 will be able to sign up for the free online courses "One Hour Coding" and "Learning to Program," which will be offered in conjunction with Colombia's Coding Week (Oct. 6-10). The online courses will also be available in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico, Peru and Puerto Rico. "One Hour Coding" (aka Hour of Code in the U.S.) is a short introductory course in which participants will learn how the technology works and how to create applications, and it offers "a playful immersion in the computer sciences," Microsoft said in a statement. In the virtual, 12-session "Learning to Program" course, students will discover that "technical complexity in application development tools is a myth and that everyone can do it," the statement added. Taking a page from the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge its execs embraced, Microsoft is encouraging students to complete the Hour of Code and challenge four other friends to do the same (Google Translate).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology