Technology

Krebs Is Back Online Thanks To Google's Project Shield

Slashdot - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 12:39pm
"After the massive 600gbps DDOS attack on KrebsOnSecurity.com that forced Akamai to withdraw their (pro-bono) DDOS protection, krebsonsecurity.com is now back online, hosted by Google," reports Slashdot reader Gumbercules!!. "I am happy to report that the site is back up -- this time under Project Shield, a free program run by Google to help protect journalists from online censorship," Brian Krebs wrote today, adding "The economics of mitigating large-scale DDoS attacks do not bode well for protecting the individual user, to say nothing of independent journalists...anyone with an axe to grind and the willingness to learn a bit about the technology can become an instant, self-appointed global censor." [T]he Internet can't route around censorship when the censorship is all-pervasive and armed with, for all practical purposes, near-infinite reach and capacity. I call this rather unwelcome and hostile development the "The Democratization of Censorship...." [E]vents of the past week have convinced me that one of the fastest-growing censorship threats on the Internet today comes not from nation-states, but from super-empowered individuals who have been quietly building extremely potent cyber weapons with transnational reach... Akamai and its sister company Prolexic have stood by me through countless attacks over the past four years. It just so happened that this last siege was nearly twice the size of the next-largest attack they had ever seen before. Once it became evident that the assault was beginning to cause problems for the company's paying customers, they explained that the choice to let my site go was a business decision, pure and simple... In an interview with The Boston Globe, Akamai executives said the attack -- if sustained -- likely would have cost the company millions of dollars. One site told Krebs that Akamai-style protection would cost him $150,000 a year. "Ask yourself how many independent journalists could possibly afford that kind of protection money?" He suspects the attack was a botnet of enslaved IoT devices -- mainly cameras, DVRs, and routers -- but says the situation is exacerbated by the failure of many ISPs to implement the BCP38 security standard to filter spoofed traffic, "allowing systems on their networks to be leveraged in large-scale DDoS attacks... the biggest offenders will continue to fly under the radar of public attention unless and until more pressure is applied by hardware and software makers, as well as ISPs that are doing the right thing... What appears to be missing is any sense of urgency to address the DDoS threat on a coordinated, global scale."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

What is Ford’s strategy in its latest buying spree?

ReadWriteWeb - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 12:00pm

People may be wondering what is leading automotive giant Ford to acquire ride-sharing shuttle service Chariot.

The app-based service is well suited to Ford’s mobility goals. It already uses Ford Transit Connect vans to shuttle people around the city and accelerates the company’s vision of a ride-sharing platform in major cities by 2021.

See Also: Ford floors it for three startups from accelerator class

Chariot shuttles commuters from popular locations in San Francisco, and costs less than a taxi ride. Ford intends to expand Chariot’s service into “at least five additional markets in the next 18 months.”

Shuttle service is nothing new, a lot of tourists use a similar service when visiting New York, San Francisco, or Los Angeles. The difference with Chariot is real-time route monitoring and instant access, allowing people to hop into the van midway through the route.

Taking twelve commuters and stuffing them in a van is also a tactic Facebook, Google, and other Silicon Valley companies use to get their own staff to work on time. Unions in San Francisco have protested multiple times over shuttle service, due to long hours and low pay.

Ford also loses two wheels with GoBike

Ford also announced it is bringing GoBike, the company’s bike-sharing service, to the San Francisco Bay Area. It plans to have 7,000 bikes in SF by the end of 2018. Users will also be able to rent their bike on the FordPass platform, launching next year.

A few months ago, Ford didn’t seem to have any major plans for ride-sharing or autonomous cars. Now, it has a firm date for its first autonomous vehicle launch, 2021. It also has said it will launch a ride-sharing platform in most major cities by that time, of which we assume Chariot and GoBike will be a part.

It might not be close to Uber’s market penetration, but Ford has confirmed in the past month it is going to fight tooth and nail against the tech companies in the self-driving and ride-sharing business.

The post What is Ford’s strategy in its latest buying spree? appeared first on ReadWrite.

Categories: Technology

California Launches Mandatory Data Collection For Police Use-of-Force

Slashdot - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 11:34am
An anonymous Slashdot reader quotes the AP: All 800 police departments in California must begin using a new online tool launched Thursday to report and help track every time officers use force that causes serious injuries... The tool, named URSUS for the bear on California's flag, includes fields for the race of those injured and the officers involved, how their interaction began and why force was deemed necessary. "It's sort of like TurboTax for use-of-force incidents," said Justin Erlich, a special assistant attorney general overseeing the data collection and analysis. Departments must report the data under a new state law passed last November. Though some departments already tracked such data on their own, many did not... "As a country, we must engage in an honest, transparent, and data-driven conversation about police use of force," California Attorney General Kamala Harris said in a news release. It's an open source tool developed by Bayes Impact, and California plans to share the code with other interested law enforcement agencies across the country. Only three other states currently require their police departments to track data about use-of-force incidents, "but their systems aren't digital, and in Colorado's case, only capture shootings."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

The Ig Nobel Awards Celebrate Their 26th First Annual Awards Ceremony

Slashdot - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 10:34am
Thursday Harvard's Sanders Theatre hosted the 26th edition of the humorous research awards "that make people laugh, then think...intended to celebrate the unusual, honor the imaginative -- and spur people's interest in science, medicine, and technology." One of this year's winners actually lived as a goat, wearing prosthetic extensions on his arms and legs so he could travel the countryside with other goats. Long-time Slashdot reader tomhath writes: The Journal of Improbable announced these winners: REPRODUCTION PRIZE [EGYPT] -- The late Ahmed Shafik, for studying the effects of wearing polyester, cotton, or wool trousers on the sex life of rats, and for conducting similar tests with human males. ECONOMICS PRIZE [NEW ZEALAND, UK] -- Mark Avis, Sarah Forbes, and Shelagh Ferguson, for assessing the perceived personalities of rocks, from a sales and marketing perspective... PEACE PRIZE [CANADA, USA] -- Gordon Pennycook, James Allan Cheyne, Nathaniel Barr, Derek Koehler, and Jonathan Fugelsang for their scholarly study called 'On the Reception and Detection of Pseudo-Profound Bullshit'... PERCEPTION PRIZE [JAPAN] -- Atsuki Higashiyama and Kohei Adachi, for investigating whether things look different when you bend over and view them between your legs. The Improable Research site lists the rest of this year's 10 winners, as well as every winner for the previous 25 years.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

How to Watch the First Presidential Debate

Wired - Top Stories - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 10:00am
The first debate is here! You've got no shortage of viewing options. The post How to Watch the First Presidential Debate appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

How ITT Tech Screwed Students and Made Millions

Slashdot - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 9:34am
An anonymous Slashdot reader shares "a grim story about a company that screwed poor people, military veterans, and taxpayers to turn a profit." Gizmodo reports: By the time ITT Technical Institute closed its doors earlier this month, the for-profit college had been selling tenuous diplomas at exorbitant prices for more than 20 years...burying low-income and first-generation students in insurmountable debt, and evading regulators since the early 1990s... ITT collected $178 million over two years just in federal education funding for veterans -- even while the company projected 33% of its students would ultimately default on their loans -- and last year 70% of the school's total revenue came directly from federal financial aid programs. Gizmodo spoke to one student who "will now spend the rest of his life paying back loans for a degree that is practically useless," after compounding interest turned his $70,000 loan into $200,000 in debt. "Like all of the former students interviewed by Gizmodo, he was placed in a job that did not require professional training" -- specifically, a game-testing position that didn't even require a high school diploma, while ITT "placed" another student in a $5.95-an-hour telemarketing job. Her assessment of ITT? "It was totally worthless."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Kentucky's Shotgun 'Drone Slayer' Gets Sued Again

Slashdot - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 7:34am
"Technology has surpassed the law..." argues a Kentucky man who fired a shotgun at a drone last year. An anonymous Slashdot reader reports: The drone's owner has now filed for damages in Federal Court over the loss of his $1,800 drone, arguing that the shotgun blast was unjustified because his drone wasn't actually trespassing or invading anyone's privacy. The defendant -- who has dubbed himself 'the Drone Slayer' -- said the aerial vehicle was over his garden and his daughter, and the verdict could ultimately set a new precedent in U.S. law: who owns the air? "Operators need to know where they can fly," argued the drone pilot's lawyer, "and owners must know when they can reasonably expect privacy and be free of prying eyes." He estimates a drone is shot from he skies about once a month, and "What happens typically is that law enforcement doesn't know what to do and civil suits are uncommon as most people don't want to get involved due to the costs." The Drone Slayer was originally charged with felony counts of wanton endangerment and criminal mischief. But all of those charges were dismissed in October when a district judge ruled he "had a right to shoot at the aircraft."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Forget VR. The Future of Roller Coasters Is About Maglev

Wired - Top Stories - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 7:16am
What if there was no friction at all? What if electro magnets propelled the cars? This is the idea behind the Sfrear Mountain Coaster. The post Forget VR. The Future of Roller Coasters Is About Maglev appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

Four Months in, I Still Can’t Get Enough Overwatch

Wired - Top Stories - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 7:00am
Overwatch is a vibrant game with a vibrant community. Four months in, it still feels like one of the best games on the market right now. The post Four Months in, I Still Can’t Get Enough Overwatch appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

How to Deal With a Cat That Only Drinks From a Running Tap

Wired - Top Stories - Sun, 09/25/2016 - 6:40am
Mr. Know It All ponders what to do with a cat that's really a PITA. The post How to Deal With a Cat That Only Drinks From a Running Tap appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology