Technology

Google’s self-driving car lab rolls into Motor City

ReadWriteWeb - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 4:00pm

In a move geared toward driving its autonomous vehicle program further down the road, tech giant Google will open a self-driving car technology center in the Detroit area.

As reported on the Yahoo! Tech site Google is launching an advanced facility in Novi, Michigan for engineers and other specialists to test cars for its self-driving vehicle program.  The 53,000 square foot facility will enable the California-based company to “further develop and refine self-driving technology.”

“For the past few years, members of our team have been working from the Greater Detroit area… Now it’s time to lay down roots,” Google’s parent company Alphabet said in a statement.

“Many of our current partners are based here, so having a local facility will help us collaborate more easily and access Michigan’s top talent in vehicle development and engineering.”

The center will trial cars provided by Fiat Chrysler in what is Google’s first direct collaboration with a car-maker to develop autonomous vehicles.

This follows Google’s earlier announcement that it has partnered with Fiat Chrysler to double the size of the company’s autonomous fleet to 200 cars.

This lab has sensible vehicles

Unlike the scary-smiley Google driverless car (above), the Detroit lab’s parking lot will look more familiar. Fiat will provide 100 Chrysler Pacifica vans to Google. The vans will be fitted with all of Google’s autonomous technology and will join Google’s other 100 cars in California for road testing.

“One of the first tasks will be to ready our self-driving Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivans. We’ll begin moving in throughout 2016,” the company said.

Previously Google has stated that it does not intend to license its self-driving vehicle technology nor market the autonomous minivans for sale.

Google began trials on self-driving cars in 2009 with a Toyota Prius that had been modified with Google technology.

As ReadWrite observed earlier this month, it is unlikely Google will build its own vehicles when driverless cars are permitted on the roads, instead working with a small selection of automotive companies. Fiat is in a powerful position to be the primary manufacturer of autonomous cars that use Google’s technology.

The post Google’s self-driving car lab rolls into Motor City appeared first on ReadWrite.

Categories: Technology

Someone In North Korea Is Hosting a Facebook Clone

Slashdot - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 3:55pm
Reporter Jason Koebler shares: Someone in North Korea appears to have created a Facebook clone, according to an internet analytics company that traced the site's DNS to the notoriously isolated country. The social network is an off-the-shelf Facebook clone called dolphinPHP. Dyn Analytics researcher Doug Madory said that "very few websites resolve to the North Korean address space, and this one does."From the screenshots in the article, the user interface, and other elements do look similar to that of Facebook.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

All European Scientific Articles To Be Freely Accessible By 2020

Slashdot - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 3:30pm
An anonymous reader shares a report on EU2016: All scientific articles in Europe must be freely accessible as of 2020. EU member states want to achieve optimal reuse of research data. They are also looking into a European visa for foreign start-up founders. And, according to the new Innovation Principle, new European legislation must take account of its impact on innovation. These are the main outcomes of the meeting of the Competitiveness Council in Brussels on 27 May. Under the presidency of Netherlands State Secretary for Education, Culture and Science Sander Dekker, the EU ministers responsible for research and innovation decided unanimously to take these significant steps.Many questions remain unanswered. For instance, it is not clear whether the publishers would be forced to make their papers available for free or whether EU will only allow scientists who are happy to abide by the rules to publish papers. We should have more details on this soon.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Sources: Jawbone is trying to sell its wireless speaker business, will focus on health and wearables (Leena Rao/Fortune)

TechMeme - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 3:00pm

Leena Rao / Fortune:
Sources: Jawbone is trying to sell its wireless speaker business, will focus on health and wearables  —  Fitness tracker maker Jawbone has put its speaker business up for sale, according to multiple sources.  —  The company has been pitching potential buyers for its Jambox wireless speaker business …

Categories: Technology

Hackers Claim to Have 427 Million Myspace Passwords

Slashdot - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 2:50pm
Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai, reporting for Motherboard: There's an oft-repeated adage in the world of cybersecurity: There are two types of companies, those that have been hacked, and those that don't yet know they have been hacked. MySpace, the social media behemoth that was, is apparently in the second category. The same hacker who was selling the data of more than 164 million LinkedIn users last week now claims to have 360 million emails and passwords of MySpace users, which would be one of the largest leaks of passwords ever. And it looks like the data is being circulated in the underground by other hackers as well. It's unclear when the data was stolen from MySpace, but both the hacker, who's known as Peace, and one of the operators of LeakedSource, a paid hacked data search engine that also claims to have the credentials, said it's from a past, unreported, breach.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

North Korea Linked to the SWIFT Bank Hacks

Slashdot - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 2:10pm
North Korea could be behind the recent string of digital attacks on Asian banks, says Symantec. The cyber security firms notes that the attacks could be traced as far back as October 2015, two months prior to the earliest known incident. As you may recall, hackers stole around $80M from Bangladesh's central bank in March, and a similar attack was seen at a Vietnamese bank earlier this month. Symantec says that it has found evidence that distinctive malware that was used in both the hacks had strong commonalities with the 2014 Sony Picture breaches. Security firm FireEye also investigated the matter. From a Bloomberg report: Investigators are examining possible computer breaches at as many as 12 banks linked to Swift's global payments network that have irregularities similar to those in the theft of $81 million from the Bangladesh central bank, according to a person familiar with the probe. FireEye, the security firm hired by the Bangladesh bank, has been contacted by the other banks, most of which are in Southeast Asia, because of signs that hackers may have breached their networks, the person said. They include banks in the Philippines and New Zealand but not in Western Europe or the United States. There is no indication of whether money was taken.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

RW Q&A: Sam George, director of Microsoft’s Azure IoT

ReadWriteWeb - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 2:00pm

Sam George, director of  Microsoft’s Azure IoT program, sat down with us to discuss how Azure IoT came about, his views on what IoT means today, why the hype is real — and what it will all mean in the future.

George describes Microsoft’s decision to launch Azure IoT as an opportunity to examine what’s next in computing.

“We knew IoT was going to be the next wave of computing after mobile,” he says. “(We are) seeing some amazing traction; it’s a great growth area. My team does an unbelievable amount of things now from open-source device software development kits (SDKs) to open source field gateways SDKs for IoT.”

He adds that’s one of the biggest challenges of a broad IoT solution. “One of the most daunting things about IoT is that it spans all of these topics, (so we) simplify that so (customers) can get started quickly.”

George: IoT is “the new normal”

George believes that “IoT is the new normal, just like web and mobile before it.”

“It’s very much here and it’s very much happening, which is nice to see. It’s not hype anymore. It’s happening all over industries which is really refreshing to see.”

However, George admits that today, IoT still largely interests the early adopters.

“Right now, the gold rush or land rush that’s happening is that the early adopters have all figured out that IoT is ready for business, and they’re rushing in right now and doing lots of things, like making sure they’re servicing less by using data analytics to predict their servicing needs.”

George hopes that in the next couple years, “IoT will enter the mainstream more and more, (with) people realizing it’s no longer hype and hasn’t been.” “It’s an exciting space to be in,” he says. “We’re thrilled to be in it. It’s fun to be at the forefront of this new wave.”

The post RW Q&A: Sam George, director of Microsoft’s Azure IoT appeared first on ReadWrite.

Categories: Technology

Hacker behind LinkedIn's 117M e-mail database claims to have 360M Myspace user emails with passwords (Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai/Motherboard)

TechMeme - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 1:50pm

Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai / Motherboard:
Hacker behind LinkedIn's 117M e-mail database claims to have 360M Myspace user emails with passwords  —  There's an oft-repeated adage in the world of cybersecurity: There are two types of companies, those that have been hacked, and those that don't yet know they have been hacked.

Categories: Technology

Gigabit Internet With No Data Caps May Be Coming To Rural America

Slashdot - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 1:30pm
Jon Brodkin, writing for Ars Technica: The Federal Communications Commission is making another $2.15 billion available for rural broadband projects, and it's trying to direct at least some of that money toward building services with gigabit download speeds and unlimited data. The FCC voted for the funding Wednesday (PDF) and released the full details yesterday (PDF). The money, $215 million a year for 10 years, will be distributed to Internet providers through a reverse auction in which bidders will commit to providing specific performance levels. Bidders can obtain money by proposing projects meeting requirements in any of four performance tiers. There's a minimum performance tier that includes speeds of at least 10Mbps downstream and 1Mbps upstream, with at least 150GB of data provided each month. A "baseline" performance tier requires 25Mbps/3Mbps speeds and at least 150GB a month, though the data allotment minimum could rise based on an FCC metric that determines what typical broadband consumers use per month.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Is a real-world wearable tricorder logical?

ReadWriteWeb - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 1:00pm

Wearables are extremely popular among the fitness conscious, counting steps, measuring heart rates, and more. But for them to become an all-encompassing health diagnostic tool – like the cool, tricorder-wielding doctors of the future use – they have to go a bit further and give you a more detailed view of your actual health.

This need to kick it up a notch inspired engineers at the University of California San Diego to develop a flexible, wearable device that captures electrocardiogram (EKG) data and lactate levels, both critical pieces of information for diagnosing and monitoring the body’s cardiovascular health.

EKG: The Next Generation?

For patients with heart disease, this small device – called the Chem-Phys patch – could very well be a lifesaver.

Currently, if someone walks in to the ER with symptoms of heart attack, the patient is plugged in to a bulky EKG machine by way of numerous patches places around the torso where the heart is monitored for a brief time to determine whether or not a heart attack was or has actually taken place.

However, this gives health professionals a quick glimpse at what a patient is actually experiencing. For ongoing heart disease cases, constant and long-term monitoring helps to better assess and address issues as they arise.

This is where the Chem-Phys patch comes in handy. Its sensors can be worn on the body, transmitting data to a portable device by way of Bluetooth, and can run throughout an entire day while the patient goes about their regular lives. You aren’t stuck in a bed for an extended period of time if you don’t need to be.

For athletes, this technology offers additional insight into training and how to best achieve maximum efficiency during workouts. A simple heart rate monitor will tell you how many beats per minute you’re achieving, but it won’t tell you how close you actually are to your physical limit, or what type of toll an activity is having on your body.

Being able to measure lactate levels alone puts this technology a step above and beyond today’s wearables.

Wearables going where no one’s gone before

Currently, the sensors are created using a screen printing process that produces a thin, flexible polyester patch that can be attached to the skin. This patch includes two EKG electrodes on either side of an electrode specializing in sensing lactate levels.

These patches are then connected to a small, portable printed circuit board that can send and receive signals via low-energy Bluetooth to a smartphone or computer.

The technology is still in its infancy, with this early progress being an exciting proof of concept. Now, researchers and engineers need to focus on optimization and testing of additional sensors, as well as perfecting the overall design to ensure maximum efficiency and reliability.

Once completed, this technology could open the door to a wide variety of tracking and monitoring solutions for not only cardiovascular health and lactate levels, but for other critical chemical markets including magnesium and potassium. Additional vital signs, such as body temperature, respiration rate, and more could also be achieved with additional development.

The post Is a real-world wearable tricorder logical? appeared first on ReadWrite.

Categories: Technology

UK carrier Three to test 24 hour, opt-in, network level mobile ad blocking during the week of June 13 (Nick Summers/Engadget)

TechMeme - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 12:30pm

Nick Summers / Engadget:
UK carrier Three to test 24 hour, opt-in, network level mobile ad blocking during the week of June 13  —  Three will soon trial network-level ad blocking in the UK.  Such a move was telegraphed back in February, when the carrier inked a deal with Shine, a company that specialises in the practice.

Categories: Technology

Google app on iOS gets faster load times, AMP articles in search, keyboard shortcuts, more (Abner Li/9to5Google)

TechMeme - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 11:55am

Abner Li / 9to5Google:
Google app on iOS gets faster load times, AMP articles in search, keyboard shortcuts, more  —  Faster load and search times are the highlight feature of an update to the Google app on iOS.  Like on the mobile web and Android, AMP articles will now show up in search results.

Categories: Technology

Is this pen your next 3D printer?

ReadWriteWeb - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 11:30am

Scientists at Harvard have created an amazing new 3D pen that creates metallic objects with ease.

Similar to the recent 3Doodler pen in some concepts, this new pen goes above and beyond and was created for adult use, with various possibilities in mind.

See also: 10 Crazy Things 3D Printers Can Make Today

This new pen could assist in making parts needed for medical devices. Earlier versions of 3D printers are held back in their ability to produce certain designs, because they have to be fixed to a frame for support. However, with this new printer pen, one can produce intricate objects that include bends, curves and loops.

With this capability, the sky is the limit when it comes to what this new printer can be used for. It may also end up playing a big part in the wearable industry, becoming the next big thing in how wearables are designed.

Pen turns silver to “ink”

This 3D printer pen works by using ink made of silver nanoparticles that harden when they are hit by a laser on the pen.

The particles are squeezed out of the bottom of the pen, while the laser is on, allowing an individual to create 3D objects right in the air.

What is really fascinating is how small the items are that the pen can create, because it is able to produce lines as thin as human hair strands.

Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering team members discussed how they went about in creating this 3D printer pen. One of the biggest problems they had was figuring out the correct distance between the laser and the nozzle, in order for the pen to actually work. If the laser was too close to the nozzle, then the ink became solidified and clogged up the pen.

With all the things it can produce, this pen could well revolutionize the 3D printer market.

The post Is this pen your next 3D printer? appeared first on ReadWrite.

Categories: Technology

ZTE launches 5.5-inch Google Daydream-ready Axon 7 for $450 alongside its first VR headset (Evan Blass/VentureBeat)

TechMeme - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 10:55am

Evan Blass / VentureBeat:
ZTE launches 5.5-inch Google Daydream-ready Axon 7 for $450 alongside its first VR headset  —  ZTE has launched its second Axon-branded flagship, the Axon 7, alongside a compatible virtual reality headset, known as ZTE VR.  The 5.5-inch, Android 6. Marshmallow-powered handset aims to deliver top …

Categories: Technology

Big Win For Fair Use: Jury Says Google's Use Of Java API's Was Fair Use... On To The Appeal (Mike Masnick/Techdirt)

TechMeme - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 10:30am

Mike Masnick / Techdirt:
Big Win For Fair Use: Jury Says Google's Use Of Java API's Was Fair Use... On To The Appeal  —  This is somewhat surprising, but good: after a few days of deliberation, the jury in the redo of the Oracle v. Google case concerning Google's use of Java's APIs in Android has resulted …

Categories: Technology

8 Wild Ideas That Debuted at the Indy 500, From Seat Belts to Mirrors

Wired - Top Stories - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 10:00am
If you think the Indy 500 hasn't impacted your life, pump your brakes, buckle your seat belt, or look in your rearview mirror. The post 8 Wild Ideas That Debuted at the Indy 500, From Seat Belts to Mirrors appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

A Trailer for the Hard-R X-Men: Apocalypse Fox Didn’t Make

Wired - Top Stories - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 9:00am
Curious what an R-rated X-Men movie might look like? We made a parody trailer for that. The post A Trailer for the Hard-R X-Men: Apocalypse Fox Didn't Make appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology

Review: Iris Smart Home Watering System

Wired - Top Stories - Fri, 05/27/2016 - 7:00am
Don't want to install an underground irrigation system that talks to your phone? Try these low-cost connected gadgets. The post Review: Iris Smart Home Watering System appeared first on WIRED.
Categories: Open Source, Technology