Technology

Facebook updates Graph API with features for managing Pages, brings versioning to Ads API (Emil Protalinski/VentureBeat)

TechMeme - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 5:25pm

Emil Protalinski / VentureBeat:
Facebook updates Graph API with features for managing Pages, brings versioning to Ads API  —  Facebook today updated its Graph API and Ads API to version 2.2.  The former is getting new features for apps that manage Pages and the latter is getting versioning support for the first time.

Categories: Technology

Pirate Bay Founder Convicted on Hacking Charges

Wired - Top Stories - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 5:20pm

The founder of the file-sharing site Pirate Bay was found guilty today in Denmark on hacking charges unrelated to the web site. Swedish national Gottfrid Svartholm was found guilty of hacking into servers belonging to the U.S. technology firm CSC after being partially acquitted of other hacking charges in Sweden. In the Danish case, Svartholm […]

The post Pirate Bay Founder Convicted on Hacking Charges appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Google Play Books improves non-fiction reading with "Skim" mode, "Quick bookmarks" tool, and notes browsing (Greg Kumparak/TechCrunch)

TechMeme - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 5:10pm

Greg Kumparak / TechCrunch:
Google Play Books improves non-fiction reading with “Skim” mode, “Quick bookmarks” tool, and notes browsing  —  Google Play Books Updated To Make It A Better eReader For Students, Chefs, And Others Who Read Huge Books  —  Most eReader apps tend to be built …

Categories: Technology

Signed-In Maps Mean More Location Data For Google

Slashdot - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 5:05pm
mikejuk writes The announcement on the Google Geo Developers blog has the catchy title No map is an island. It points out that while there are now around 2 million active sites that have Google Maps embedded, they store data independently, The new feature, called attributed save, aims to overcome this problem by creating an integrated experience between the apps you use that have map content and Google Maps, and all it requires is that users sign in. So if you use a map in a specific app you will be able to see locations you entered in other apps.This all sounds great and it makes sense to allow users to take all of the locations that have previously been stored in app silos and put them all together into one big map data pool. The only down side is that the pool is owned by Google and some users might not like the idea of letting Google have access to so much personal geo information. It seems you can have convenience or you can have privacy. It might just be that many users prefer their maps to be islands.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Twitter demotes Daniel Graf, elevates Kevin Weil to lead consumer product group (Yoree Koh/Wall Street Journal)

TechMeme - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 4:55pm

Yoree Koh / Wall Street Journal:
Twitter demotes Daniel Graf, elevates Kevin Weil to lead consumer product group  —  Twitter Demotes Product Chief Daniel Graf  —  Kevin Weil Becomes Fifth Product Head in As Many Years  —  Twitter Inc. has demoted its new head of product, Daniel Graf, just six months after his much-touted hire away from Google Inc.

Categories: Technology

Groupon Q3 Beats The Street On Sales Of $757.1M, EPS Of $0.03 (Ingrid Lunden/TechCrunch)

TechMeme - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 4:50pm

Ingrid Lunden / TechCrunch:
Groupon Q3 Beats The Street On Sales Of $757.1M, EPS Of $0.03  —  Still pushing hard on its strategy to be more than just a site for daily deals, e-commerce powerhouse Groupon reported its quarterly earnings today, reporting revenues of $757.1 million on non-GAAP earnings per share of $0.03, but a negative EPS of $0.03 on a GAAP basis.

Categories: Technology

Kamcord gameplay recording platform gets into mobile gaming competitions starting with SEGA (Jordan Kahn/9to5Mac)

TechMeme - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 4:45pm

Jordan Kahn / 9to5Mac:
Kamcord gameplay recording platform gets into mobile gaming competitions starting with SEGA  —  Kamcord, the mobile gameplay recording platform that offers developers an easy way to implement cross-platform gameplay recording and sharing features, is today announcing its next big push in mobile gaming: competitions.

Categories: Technology

Pirate Bay Founder Gottfrid Warg Faces Danish Jail Time

Slashdot - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 4:23pm
Hammeh writes BBC news reports that Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Warg has been found guilty of hacking into computers and illegally downloading files in Denmark. Found guilty of breaching security to access computers owned by technology giant CSC to steal police and social security files, Mr Warg faces a sentence of up to six years behind bars. Mr Warg argued that although the computer used to commit the offence was owned by him, the hacks were carried out by another individual who he declined to name.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

First Detailed Data Analysis Shows Exactly How Comcast Jammed Netflix

Slashdot - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 3:42pm
An anonymous reader writes John Oliver calls it "cable company f*ckery" and we've all suspected it happens. Now on Steven Levy's new Backchannel publication on Medium, Susan Crawford delivers decisive proof, expertly dissecting the Comcast-Netflix network congestion controversy. Her source material is a detailed traffic measurement report (.pdf) released this week by Google-backed M-Lab — the first of its kind — showing severe degradation of service at interconnection points between Comcast, Verizon and other monopoly "eyeball networks" and "transit networks" such as Cogent, which was contracted by Netflix to deliver its bits. The report shows that interconnection points give monopoly ISPs all the leverage they need to discriminate against companies like Netflix, which compete with them in video services, simply by refusing to relieve network congestion caused by external traffic requested by their very own ISP customers. And the effects victimize not only companies targeted but ALL incoming traffic from the affected transit network. The report proves the problem is not technical, but rather a result of business decisions. This is not technically a Net neutrality problem, but it creates the very same headaches for consumers, and unfair business advantages for ISPs. In an accompanying article, Crawford makes a compelling case for FCC intervention.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Nintendo’s New Health Device Listens to You Sleep

Wired - Top Stories - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 3:22pm

Nintendo's first entry into the "quality of life" business, which it plans to release by early 2016, is a device that tracks a user's level of fatigue by monitoring sleep.

The post Nintendo’s New Health Device Listens to You Sleep appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

How Apple Watch Is Really a Regression In Watchmaking

Slashdot - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 3:00pm
Nerval's Lobster writes Apple design chief Jony Ive has spent the past several weeks talking up how the Apple Watch is an evolution on many of the principles that guided the evolution of timepieces over the past several hundred years. But the need to recharge the device on a nightly basis, now confirmed by Apple CEO Tim Cook, is a throwback to ye olden days, when a lady or gentleman needed to keep winding her or his pocket-watch in order to keep it running. Watch batteries were supposed to bring "winding" to a decisive end, except for that subset of people who insist on carrying around a mechanical timepiece. But with Apple Watch's requirement that the user constantly monitor its energy, what's old is new again. Will millions of people really want to charge and fuss with their watch at least once a day?

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Digital Innovation and the Future of Storytelling: A New Golden Age?

Wired - Top Stories - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 2:26pm

The media world was taken by surprise when HBO — and subsequently CBS — announced they will allow consumers to bypass traditional pay TV distributors to access entertainment content directly via the Internet. This move was seen as both validation of and a direct challenge to Netflix, whose rapid growth has dramatically changed the way […]

The post Digital Innovation and the Future of Storytelling: A New Golden Age? appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

A Mixed Review For CBS's "All Access" Online Video Streaming

Slashdot - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 2:18pm
lpress writes I tested CBS All Access video streaming. It has technical problems, which will be resolved, but I will still pass because they show commercials in addition to a $5.99 per month fee. Eventually, we will all cut the cord and have a choice of viewing modes — on-demand versus scheduled and with and without commercials — but don't expect your monthly bill to drop as long as our ISPs are monopolies or oligopolies.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Fiat Is Selling Ferrari. What’s the Worst That Could Happen?

Wired - Top Stories - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 2:12pm

Brand aficionados (including us) are concerned about what could happen to a publicly traded Ferrari.

The post Fiat Is Selling Ferrari. What’s the Worst That Could Happen? appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Tim Cook: "I'm Proud To Be Gay"

Slashdot - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 1:37pm
An anonymous reader writes Apple CEO Tim Cook has publicly come out as gay. While he never hid his sexuality from friends, family, and close co-workers, Cook decided it was time to make it publicly known in the hopes that the information will help others who don't feel comfortable to do so. He said, "I don't consider myself an activist, but I realize how much I've benefited from the sacrifice of others. So if hearing that the CEO of Apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is, or bring comfort to anyone who feels alone, or inspire people to insist on their equality, then it's worth the trade-off with my own privacy." Cook added that while the U.S. has made progress in recent years toward marriage equality, there is still work to be done. "[T]here are laws on the books in a majority of states that allow employers to fire people based solely on their sexual orientation. There are many places where landlords can evict tenants for being gay, or where we can be barred from visiting sick partners and sharing in their legacies. Countless people, particularly kids, face fear and abuse every day because of their sexual orientation."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

The Best Thing About Microsoft’s Health Tracker Is That It’s Cross-Platform

Wired - Top Stories - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 1:00pm

Microsoft has been working on its own health tracking service, Microsoft Health, and a wearable to go along with it, Microsoft Band. Both are available starting today.

The post The Best Thing About Microsoft’s Health Tracker Is That It’s Cross-Platform appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Slashdot Asks: Appropriate Place For Free / Open Source Software Artifacts?

Slashdot - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 12:55pm
A friend of mine who buys and sells used books, movies, etc. recently purchased a box full of software on CD, including quite a few old Linux distributions, and asked me if I'd like them. The truth is, I would like them, but I've already collected over the last two decades more than I should in the way of Linux distributions, on at least four kinds of media (starting with floppies made from a CD that accompanied a fat book on how to install some distribution or other -- very useful in the days of dialup). I've got some boxes (Debian Potato, and a few versions of Red Hat and Mandrake Linux), and an assortment of marketing knickknacks, T-shirts, posters, and books. I like these physical artifacts, and they're not dominating my life, but I'd prefer to actually give many of them to someplace where they'll be curated. (Or, if they should be tossed, tossed intelligently.) Can anyone point to a public collection of some kind that gathers physical objects associated with Free software and Open Source, and makes them available for others to examine? (I plan to give some hardware, like a pair of OLPC XO laptops, to the same Goodwill computer museum highlighted in this video, but they probably don't want an IBM-branded radio in the shape of a penguin.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Why Web Tools Like AngularJS Need To Keep Breaking Themselves

ReadWriteWeb - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 12:54pm

As the line between native and Web applications increasingly blurs, more developers are turning to Web application frameworks like AngularJS. AngularJS, developed and open sourced by Google, has been especially hot, whether measured by general interest, jobs, or open source contributions, largely due to its ease of use

See also: Ember, Angular and Backbone—Which Web Framework Is Best For You?

But not everyone is happy. According to AngularJS critic-in-residence Danny Tuppeny, the AngularJS development community has "lost its marbles" of late. But is his criticism valid?

Why AngularJS?

AngularJS is a popular Web application framework—a collection of JavaScript code libraries, templates and other software intended to make it easier for developers to build dynamic Web pages or Web apps.

See also: Why Even Simple Technology Can Be Hard For Developers

Web frameworks are hot in general, but AngularJS is blisteringly so, as measured by relative growth in job postings:

Source: Indeed.com Job Trends

There are several reasons for this popularity, and Starsheet VP of Products Adam Conrad names three:

  1. It's Google-approved: "Angular is built and maintained by dedicated (and highly talented) Google engineers. This means you not only have a large open community to learn from, but you also have skilled, highly-available engineers tasked to help you get your Angular questions answered"
  2. It's comprehensive: "No other plugins or frameworks are necessary to build a data-driven web application"
  3. It's easy: "With a few attributes added to your HTML, you can have a simple Angular app up in under 5 minutes"

These are good reasons to use AngularJS. It turns out, however, that there are some pretty strong reasons not to, some of which emerge in the comments section of Conrad's article.

Why Not AngularJS?

Some criticisms are particularly focused. Tom Dale, one of the creators of EmberJS, a rival framework, worries that AngularJS may be attempting too much:

Dale is, of course, biased, and occasionally lets it show in rants like this one

But he also has a valid point, one that comes through even more strongly in Tuppeny's broadside. For Tuppeny, the problem with AngularJS isn't its ambition or its pace of development, but rather the way it routinely leaves developers behind:

Our current codebase has parts that are over 10 years old; and we hope our new codebase will last this long too. It seems that if we start writing Angular today; we’ll be forced to rewrite the frontend in three to four years at latest (and with the way apps are going, the frontend is likely to be a large codebase). This doesn’t sound very attractive.... We need frameworks that are stable and supported long-term; not that are constantly inventing new concepts and being rewritten with breaking changes every 5 minutes. Of everyone, Google should know how hard it is to maintain large web apps

Google and the AngularJS community, in other words, may be acting like... well, Google, which regularly dumps or revamps its Web applications after just a few short years. This is par for the course with fast-moving Web companies, but may not fit a more staid enterprise application lifecycle.

Which may be the point.

AngularJS: Breaking By Design

We don't live in a world with 10-year product lifecycles anymore. If your company does, you may want to find a new job. As Ars Tempo founder Zlatko Đurić writes:

[W]e should rebuild our components every 3-5 years anyway. Do you still write code the same way you did 4 years ago? If yes, then why using angular in the first place, why not just use components you've built your stuff with before it? Using the same browser APIs, the same things you relied on in the past?

The payoff is worth it, he continues:

To me, it's still the ... ideas that power the Angular framework that matter. Like DI and data binding. Those things make me able to develop a new webapp in 3 weeks instead of 3 months. That's what matters. And if in 5 years, when I'm two years into Angular2, somebody asks me to extend my old app built with 1.2, I'll probably be pissed at how verbose or stiff the old Angular API was. Or that I can't just use a finished component for it.

AngularJS developer Pascal Precht echoes this sentiment:

I think before you judge about the new templating syntax that comes with Angular 2.0, [Tuppeny] should at least mention why that is. The next version of Angular is built for the future. That means, embracing technologies like Web Components. In order to do that, Angular has to be rewritten, since the current version of it sits on top of a design made like 4 years ago.

The Web, in other words, pushes us forward, and AngularJS seems to be willing to sacrifice backward compatibility to get there. Yes, it probably could be done more cleanly, with less heartache for developers. But no, the alternative is not to comfortably recline in the easy chair of the current Web. 

The Web, after all, will force us to continuously break with the past, perhaps more often than is comfortable. But that's the pace at which innovation goes today. 

There is no rest, saith the Web, for the application developer.

Lead image courtesy of Shutterstock

Categories: Technology

Five Ways to Move Your Big Data Projects Into the Cloud

Wired - Top Stories - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 12:41pm

As the cloud goes mainstream, the technology will become crucial to executives handling projects powered by analytics. Which basically means every department head. Because the insights that analytics are churning out these days are the biggest drivers of new business models, closer ties with customers, and more production collaboration with partners, customers and employees.  But as more data […]

The post Five Ways to Move Your Big Data Projects Into the Cloud appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Hacking Team Manuals: Sobering Reminder That Privacy is Elusive

Slashdot - Thu, 10/30/2014 - 12:13pm
Advocatus Diaboli writes with a selection from The Intercept describing instructions for commercial spyware sold by Italian security firm Hacking Team. The manuals describe Hacking Team's software for government technicians and analysts, showing how it can activate cameras, exfiltrate emails, record Skype calls, log typing, and collect passwords on targeted devices. They also catalog a range of pre-bottled techniques for infecting those devices using wifi networks, USB sticks, streaming video, and email attachments to deliver viral installers. With a few clicks of a mouse, even a lightly trained technician can build a software agent that can infect and monitor a device, then upload captured data at unobtrusive times using a stealthy network of proxy servers, all without leaving a trace. That, at least, is what Hacking Team's manuals claim as the company tries to distinguish its offerings in the global marketplace for government hacking software. (Here are the manuals themselves.)

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology