Technology

Bloomberg’s Future Is the Future of News for Everyone

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 6:19pm

Bloomberg laid off dozens of journalists yesterday and is reorganizing itself to meet the paradoxical imperatives of doing news today.

The post Bloomberg’s Future Is the Future of News for Everyone appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Tech Makers: Stop Treating Tablets Like Smartphones

ReadWriteWeb - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 6:00pm

Guest author Liraz Margalit, PhD, is a web psychologist at ClickTale, a company that provides website optimization software and consulting.

Smartphones and tablets both get us online, store our photos and keep track of our calendars. But they are not the same. In fact, user behavior varies quite a bit between the two.

While they're both portable and sleek, and used to get online access when users are away from desktop computers, people have different mindsets around them. 

See also: The Biggest Digital Marketing Mistakes Entrepreneurs Make

In the course of my job as a web psychologist, I’m deeply steeped in research, much of which reveals distinct and separate usage patterns. The smaller devices, which tend to be carried on our person, tends to inspire active engagement, while the larger tablets are often used more passively.

For tech companies and developers for each device category, it’s crucial to understand these differences. If people come to their devices with different goals, then approaches catering to them and appealing to them need to be distinct and carefully crafted as well.

A Tablet Is Not A Mobile

There’s a penchant in the tech community to consider tablet devices as nothing more than jumbo-sized smartphones. Sure, tablets could qualify as mobile devices, with their apps, email access and 3G connections. But lumping them together is a mistake, because they each occupy different purposes in the lives of end users. 

See also: You’re Managing Your Customer Journeys All Wrong

When you own a smartphone and add a tablet to the mix, you don’t end up using your smartphone any less. If both of the devices filled the same purpose, usage time with one would cut into that of the other. But they don’t compete, because users come to their tablets and smartphones for entirely different purposes.

A 2014 Mobile Behavior Report showed that only 14 percent of consumers associate the word “mobile” with their tablets and e-readers, despite their portability and wireless Internet access. So while our smartphones are in our pockets and  bags, always at the ready, our tablets tend to be in-home devices.

The larger screen may seem ripe for productivity—and in some cases, if that’s the purpose driving the purchase, they may be—but don’t expect all (or even most) tablet users to actively engage them. Mobile phones travel with us, and we use them with a “goal-oriented” state of mind. Tablets, on the other hand, are considered more stationary and at-home and we use them with “browsing” state of mind. Usage of the larger device tends to be more passive, because people associate them with watching videos, movies and reading.

So, for instance, demanding active behavior such as registration or entry of personal details may cause your potential tablet customers to ditch your page or app all together.

Tablets And Buying Behavior: More Like Computers Than Phones

ClickTale’s extensive analysis of customer behavior on the websites of leading enterprises including Wal-Mart and North Face has shown that purchase behavior also varies widely between mobile, tablet and desktop.

Customers love to use their portable devices for browsing, “window-shopping” and pre-purchase activities such as price comparison. When it comes to actually whipping out their credit cards and closing the sale, however, desktops or laptops are still overwhelming the machines of choice, with tablets coming in second.

There's a psychological explanation for this. Our smartphones are the most intimate of our devices—they sit on our body; they are stroked with our fingers; they know the most intimate details of our lives and schedules. Desktops sit away from us, however. They feel much more separate and distinct. They don’t travel with us, and to access the screen we use a mouse, not our fingertips.

Here, too, tablets differ from phones by virtue of their in-home usage. People often think of them as a sister of the desktop computer, rather than the smartphone, which situates them somewhere in between the two.

Purchases on desktops, our analysts have found, tend to fall in the functional category—clothing necessities, for example, and essential non-luxury items. On mobiles, however, purchases are significantly more emotional: a last-minute re-booked flight from an airport departures lounge, for example, or a novelty item that restaurant companions discovered on their phones and decided, on a whim, to splurge on.

Tablets, like their function, fall in the middle ground. Tablet customers are motivated by both emotion and sensation. These purchases are not the necessities bought on desktops, and they aren’t impulse buys like those on smartphones. Tablet shoppers tend to take their time and let items sit in their cart before pulling the trigger and eventually buying.

Whether they realize it or not, people have developed specific mental schemes around these gadgets. It takes more than one-size-fits-all features and strategies to succeed in this multi-device (and multi-platform) age. In development and marketing, you need to consider the unique place that each occupy in people’s lives. Tailor your efforts for the device at hand, and you will find that users will be significantly easier to reach. 

Lead photo by Clemens Löcker

Categories: Technology

Netflix Open Sources Sleepy Puppy XSS Hunter

Slashdot - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 5:54pm
msm1267 writes: Netflix has released a tool it calls Sleepy Puppy. The tool injects cross-site scripting payloads into a target app that may not be vulnerable, but could be stored in a database and tracks the payload if it's reflected to a secondary application that makes use of the data in the same field. "We were looking for a way to provide coverage on applications that come from different origins or may not be publicly accessible," said co-developer Scott Behrens, a senior application security engineer at Netflix. "We also wanted to observe where stored data gets reflected back, and how data that may be stored publicly could also be reflected in a large number of internal applications." Sleepy Puppy is available on Netflix's Github repository and is one of a slew of security tools its engineers have released to open source.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Here’s an 18-Hour Livestream of Star Wars Toy Unboxings

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 5:43pm

You ain't never seen a product rollout like this.

The post Here’s an 18-Hour Livestream of Star Wars Toy Unboxings appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

FTC Slaps Machinima on the Wrist for Its Paid Endorsements

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 5:34pm

Brand deal between Machinima and Microsoft netted some YouTube video makers up to $30,000 payouts for positive coverage of the Xbox One.

The post FTC Slaps Machinima on the Wrist for Its Paid Endorsements appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Why Do So Many Tech Workers Dislike Their Jobs?

Slashdot - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 5:10pm
Nerval's Lobster writes: So what if you work for a tech company that offers free lunch, in-house gym, and dry cleaning? A new survey suggests that a majority of software engineers, developers, and sysadmins are miserable. Granted, the survey in question only involved 5,000 respondents, so it shouldn't be viewed as comprehensive (it was also conducted by a company that deals in employee engagement), but it's nonetheless insightful into the reasons why a lot of tech pros apparently dislike their jobs. Apparently perks don't matter quite so much if your employees have no sense of mission, don't have a clear sense of how they can get promoted, and don't interact with their co-workers very well. While that should be glaringly obvious, a lot of companies are still fixated on the idea that minor perks will apparently translate into huge morale boosts; but free smoothies in the cafeteria only goes so far.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Sorry, NFL Games Streamed Free to TV Won’t Become the Norm

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 5:02pm

CBS will stream the Super Bowl for free to TVs. But football fans shouldn't cut the cord just yet.

The post Sorry, NFL Games Streamed Free to TV Won’t Become the Norm appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Yep, Apple And Samsung Are Going to Court Again

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 4:26pm

Apple's epic legal battle with Samsung still isn't over.

The post Yep, Apple And Samsung Are Going to Court Again appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

How Open Film Project "Cosmos Laundromat" Made Blender Better

Slashdot - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 4:26pm
An anonymous reader writes: At the beginning of August the Blender Institute released Cosmos Laundromat: First Cycle, its seventh open project. More than just a 10-minute short film, Cosmos Laundromat is the Blender Institute's most ambitious project, a pilot for the first fully free and open animated feature film. In his article on Opensource.com animator and open source advocate Jason van Gumster highlights the film project and takes a look at some of its most significant contributions to the Blender open source project.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Acer’s Little Modular PC Snaps Together Like Legos

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 4:16pm

The Revo Build Mini PC lets you build your own system with little component-filled blocks.

The post Acer’s Little Modular PC Snaps Together Like Legos appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Mutt 1.5.24 Released

Slashdot - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 4:00pm
kthreadd writes: Version 1.5.24 of the Mutt email client has been released. New features in this release includes among other things terminal status-line (TS) support, a new color object 'prompt', the ability to encrypt postponed messages and opportunistic encryption which automatically enables/disables encryption based on message recipients. SSLv3 is now also disabled by default.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Can Living In Total Darkness For 5 Days "Reset" the Visual System?

Slashdot - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 3:41pm
the_newsbeagle writes: That's what one neuroscientist is aiming to find out. He wants to put patients with a type of amblyopia, the vision problem commonly called lazy eye, into the dark for 5 days. His hypothesis: When they emerge, their brains' visual cortices will be temporarily "plastic" and changeable, and may begin to process the visual signals from their bad eyes correctly. Before he could do this study, though, he had to do a test run to figure out logistics. So he himself lived in a pitch black room for 5 days. One finding: Eating ravioli in the dark is hard.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Today's Developer: Multilingual, Excited For The Future ... And Worried About Keeping Up

ReadWriteWeb - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 3:33pm

A new study, the Developer Insights Report, reveals some fascinating characteristics about today's developers: Apparently, they tend to be fluent in a variety of languages, excited about the rush of innovation sweeping the tech scene and, at the same time, overwhelmed by it all. 

The inaugural report, produced by the Application Developers Alliance and IDC, surveyed more than 850 developers about topics including the use of coding languages, types of projects tackled, attitudes about work and ambitions for the future. 

See also: JavaScript Dominates GitHub, Language Study Shows

Another key finding: The representation of female developers also seems to be on the rise, suggesting that recent attention on women in technology is manifesting in some real-world results. Here's more on what the report uncovered. 

First, The Good NewsADA report 3 (Source: ADA)

The study found that developers are a rather multilingual bunch these days: As many as 88% know more than one language, with the largest group (70%) using between two and four in the last year. Some 18% used more than five over that period. 

The number of women in the industry is also growing: While they only make up 25% of developers overall, the figure jumps to 42% when looking at those in their first year on the job.

Eighty-seven percent of the participants come from the mobile development sector, with Java the most highly cited programming skill (68% are at a moderate or advanced level). Most devs—at 71%—work on both business and consumer apps. 

The Downsides

The report also explores some of the downsides of software and web development. 

When looking at the question of why projects fail, the top three reasons were changing or poorly documented requirements (48%), under-funding or under-resourcing (40%) and poor team or organizational management (37%).

Then there are the challenges of the future: The participants reported that their biggest concern is staying current with modern technology and tools. (The major of programmers turn to search engines and online forums for help with a problem.) Maintaining the ability to produce quality code and keeping a work/life balance came in at second and third place, respectively. 

This suggests that the people responsible for the exciting new technologies and features place much more importance on work than their own personal lives—which also should make employers more deeply consider the consequences of escalating burnout among their ranks. 

What Gets Developers Excited

Let's end on a high note: What gets devs excited about the future. Forty-four percent said wearables was the growing technology that excited them most—Apple Watch and all—while 39% named robotics and 35% pegged the consumer Internet of Things movement. 

See also: 6 Steps Developers Need To Take To Harness The Internet Of Things

At the bottom of the list was drones, with 19%. (Apparently, they're not as exciting for devs as they are for gadget lovers.) 

The whole 39-page report is worth picking through, as it covers open-source software, developer experience, the use of particular tools and reliance on cloud computing. 

"The Alliance Global Developer Insights survey shows an increasingly diverse developer universe that is dealing with the increasingly stressful and complex demands of modern business," the report concludes. "The survey provides a broad view of the nature of modern application development, highlighting the increased focus on front-end development, the rise of the consumer app developer and continued adoption of agile methodologies as organizations focus on smaller software development teams."

Lead photo by Phil Whitehouse; all other images courtesy of the Application Developers Alliance

Categories: Technology

Land Rover Has a Cloaking Device for Your Horse Trailer

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 3:20pm

Land Rover is developing a special rear view mirror that makes that pesky trailer invisible. Well, sort of.

The post Land Rover Has a Cloaking Device for Your Horse Trailer appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Just How Far Can a Motorcycle Lean in a Turn?

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 3:04pm

In MotoGP races, you will often see motorcycles in a turn with extreme lean angles. Can we calculate the lean angle based on turning acceleration and coefficient of friction? Yes.

The post Just How Far Can a Motorcycle Lean in a Turn? appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

Review: Moto X Pure Edition

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 3:00pm

Motorola's been making smart, adaptive phones for years. Now it's making good ones.

The post Review: Moto X Pure Edition appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

The New Moto 360 Might Be the Prettiest Smartwatch Yet

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 3:00pm

The new Moto 360 may have the looks and customization options to woo a new batch of buyers.

The post The New Moto 360 Might Be the Prettiest Smartwatch Yet appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology

China Preparing To Send Crewed Shenzhou 11 To Tiangong 2 Space Station In 2016

Slashdot - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 2:57pm
MarkWhittington writes: China has not sent people into space since the mission of the Shenzhou 10 to the prototype space station Tiangong 1 in June 2013. Since then the Chinese have accomplished the landing of the Chang'e 3 on the lunar surface. According to a story in Space Daily, the hiatus in Chinese crewed spaceflight is about to end with the launch of the Tiangong-2 prototype space station in 2016 with the subsequent visit by a crew of Chinese astronauts on board the Shenzhou 11. The mission will be a prelude to the construction of a larger Chinese space station, slated to be completed by 2022.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Open Source, Technology

Don’t Be Fooled: This Adorable Little Drone Means Business

Wired - Top Stories - Wed, 09/02/2015 - 2:40pm

The Vantage Robotics Snap may look like a toy, but it has a versatile, stabilized 4K camera with advanced features.

The post Don’t Be Fooled: This Adorable Little Drone Means Business appeared first on WIRED.











Categories: Open Source, Technology