Technology

Global online population hits 3 billion: ITU (Leon Spencer/ZDNet)

TechMeme - 2 hours 8 min ago

Leon Spencer / ZDNet:
Global online population hits 3 billion: ITU  —  Summary: There are now more than 3 billion people online globally, with two-thirds of all people with internet access now living in the developing world, according to new research by the United Nations agency charged with improving the world's access to IT infrastructure.

Categories: Technology

Slack Now Letting Employers Tap Workers' Private Chats

Slashdot - 3 hours 19 min ago
itwbennett writes: Chat app maker Slack is hoping to make inroads in the enterprise with a new paid plan that will include an optional feature called Compliance Exports that will let administrators access their team's communications, encompassing public and private messages. The tool is far-reaching, potentially including the edit history for workers' messages as well as messages workers have marked for deletion, if the supervisor so desires.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Universal Picks Up Steve Jobs Movie (Gregg Kilday/Hollywood Reporter)

TechMeme - 4 hours 33 min ago

Gregg Kilday / Hollywood Reporter:
Universal Picks Up Steve Jobs Movie  —  Danny Boyle is set to direct the feature, written by Aaron Sorkin  —  Less than a week after Sony Pictures put the high-profile Steve Jobs movie into turnaround, Universal Pictures has stepped up and adopted the project.

Categories: Technology

Regin Cyberespionage Platform Also Spies on GSM Networks (Michael Mimoso/Threatpost)

TechMeme - 4 hours 58 min ago

Michael Mimoso / Threatpost:
Regin Cyberespionage Platform Also Spies on GSM Networks  —  Researchers have uncovered a complex espionage platform reminiscent of Duqu that has been used since at least 2008 not only to spy on and extract email and documents from government agencies, research institutions and banks …

Categories: Technology

Attack of the One-Letter Programming Languages

Slashdot - 5 hours 27 min ago
snydeq writes: The programming world is fast proliferating with one-letter programming languages, many of which tackle specific problems in ways worthy of a cult following, writes InfoWorld's Peter Wayner in this somewhat tongue-in-cheek roundup of the more interesting entrants among this trend. "They're all a bit out there, with the possible exception of C. ... Each offers compelling ideas that could do the trick in solving a particular problem you need fixed.'"

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Here's What Your Car Could Look Like In 2030

Slashdot - 6 hours 9 min ago
Nerval's Lobster writes: If you took your cubicle, four wheels, powerful AI, and brought them all together in unholy matrimony, their offspring might look something like the self-driving future car created by design consultants IDEO. That's not to say that every car on the road in 2030 will look like a mobile office, but technology could take driving to a place where a car's convenience and onboard software (not to mention smaller size) matter more than, say, speed or handling, especially as urban areas become denser and people potentially look at "driving time" as a time to get things done or relax as the car handles the majority of driving tasks. Then again, if old science-fiction movies have proven anything, it's that visions of automobile design thirty or fifty years down the road (pun intended) tend to be far, far different than the eventual reality. (Blade Runner, for example, posited that the skies above Los Angeles would swarm with flying cars by 2019.) So it's anyone's guess what you'll be driving a couple decades from now.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Former WSJ publisher L. Gordon Crovitz is either misinformed or is deliberately misleading in recent pro-surveillance essay (Mike Masnick/Techdirt)

TechMeme - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 11:35pm

Mike Masnick / Techdirt:
Former WSJ publisher L. Gordon Crovitz is either misinformed or is deliberately misleading in recent pro-surveillance essay  —  Ridiculously Misinformed Opinion Piece In WSJ Asks Apple And Google To Make Everyone Less Safe  —  Former Wall Street Journal publisher L. Gordon Crovitz still gets to publish opinion pieces in the WSJ.

Categories: Technology

Officer Not Charged In Michael Brown Shooting

Slashdot - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 11:07pm
An anonymous reader writes: A grand jury in Missouri has decided there is no probable cause to charge police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting death of Michael Brown. "A grand jury of nine whites and three blacks had been meeting weekly since Aug. 20 to consider evidence. At least nine votes would have been required to indict Wilson. The Justice Department is conducting an investigation into possible civil rights violations that could result in federal charges." Government officials and Brown's family are urging calm in Ferguson after the contentious protests that followed Brown's death.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Once Again, Here’s Our Comprehensive Gchat Recap of The Newsroom

Wired - Top Stories - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 10:01pm

It’s three episodes down and three to go as time marches cruelly on toward the end of our fair Newsroom. Here's our latest Gchat recap of last night's episode.

The post Once Again, Here’s Our Comprehensive Gchat Recap of The Newsroom appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Uber removed blog post from data science team that examined link between prostitution and rides (Chris O'Brien/VentureBeat)

TechMeme - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 10:00pm

Chris O'Brien / VentureBeat:
Uber removed blog post from data science team that examined link between prostitution and rides  —  Earlier today, Gina Neff, an associate professor of communication at the University of Washington and the School of Public Policy at Central European University in Budapest, noticed something missing from Uber's Data Blog.

Categories: Technology

iFixit: Nexus 6 is easy to fix if you can get it open (Andrew Cunningham/Ars Technica)

TechMeme - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 8:25pm

Andrew Cunningham / Ars Technica:
iFixit: Nexus 6 is easy to fix if you can get it open  —  If you ever find yourself with a broken Nexus 6, iFixit has your back.  The site has just completed its teardown of the Google/Motorola Nexus “phablet,” and it turns out that most of the internal components are pretty easy to get to.

Categories: Technology

How the Pentagon's Robots Would Automate War

Slashdot - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 8:21pm
rossgneumann writes: Pentagon officials are worried that the U.S. military is losing its edge compared to competitors like China, and are willing to explore almost anything to stay on top—including creating robots capable of becoming fighting machines. A 72-page document throws detailed light on the far-reaching implications of the Pentagon's plan to monopolize imminent "transformational advances" in biotechnology, robotics and artificial intelligence, information technology, nanotechnology, and energy.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Twitter CFO Anthony Noto, in apparent "DM fail", expresses support for buying unnamed company (Matthew Lynley/BuzzFeed)

TechMeme - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 7:55pm

Matthew Lynley / BuzzFeed:
Twitter CFO Anthony Noto, in apparent “DM fail”, expresses support for buying unnamed company  —  A Top Twitter Executive Just Had A Massive Direct Message Fail  —  It looks like Twitter's finance chief Anthony Noto thought he was messaging another Twitter executive about buying a company.

Categories: Technology

Raspberry Pi-Powered Body Illusion Lets You Experience Parkinson's

Slashdot - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 7:40pm
hypnosec writes: Analogue, a theater/art group, has developed an interactive installation called "Transports," powered by the Raspberry Pi, that lets you experience symptoms of Parkinson's disease. In the illusion, a person's mind is tricked into believing that his/her hand is the hand shown in a point-of-view video, and the motorized glove worn by the user gives the feeling of tremors associated with Parkinson's. The glove recreates tremors, the ones experienced by patients, at 6 hertz – the upper limit of what is experienced by people with Parkinson's disease. Users are asked to follow instructions fed through headphones while using the glove, which creates an illusion of a virtual limb. They are supposed to mimic the movements of a man on the screen and manipulate real cutlery as he does.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Big IT Vendors Mostly Mum On Commercial Drone Plans

Slashdot - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 6:57pm
alphadogg writes: Word that the Federal Aviation Administration might take a very hard line on commercial drone use has those with designs on such activity nervous. But as for big enterprise IT vendors, it's really hard to tell what they think because they're keeping any plans in this field very hush-hush. More consumer oriented companies like Amazon, Facebook, and Google are active, but companies like IBM and HP are quiet, while Microsoft affirms it has nothing doing. A former FAA lawyer says sitting on the sidelines even during this unsure regulatory period is probably not a great idea. "I have a hard time believing they don't have some sort of programs in place," attorney Mark Dombroff says.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

The Internet of Anything: A Smartphone App That Lets You Control Your Office Environment

Wired - Top Stories - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 6:24pm

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have built a mobile app that aims to give office workers more control over their environment while saving energy.

The post The Internet of Anything: A Smartphone App That Lets You Control Your Office Environment appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

T-Mobile forced to stop hiding slow speeds from throttled customers (Jon Brodkin/Ars Technica)

TechMeme - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 6:15pm

Jon Brodkin / Ars Technica:
T-Mobile forced to stop hiding slow speeds from throttled customers  —  When T-Mobile US customers exceed their monthly data caps, they aren't cut off from the Internet entirely.  Instead, T-Mobile throttles their connections to 128Kbps or 64Kbps, depending on which plan they have, for the rest of the month.

Categories: Technology

Regin Malware In EU Attack Linked To US and British Intelligence Agencies

Slashdot - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 6:04pm
Advocatus Diaboli writes The Regin malware, whose existence was first reported by the security firm Symantec on Sunday, is among the most sophisticated ever discovered by researchers. Symantec compared Regin to Stuxnet, a state-sponsored malware program developed by the U.S. and Israel to sabotage computers at an Iranian nuclear facility. Sources familiar with internal investigations at Belgacom and the European Union have confirmed to The Intercept that the Regin malware was found on their systems after they were compromised, linking the spy tool to the secret GCHQ and NSA operations.

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Categories: Open Source, Technology

Star Wars: The Force Awakens Trailer Debuts This Weekend

Wired - Top Stories - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 5:59pm

Star Wars is just days away from returning to the big screen—or, at least the trailer is. Lucasfilm confirmed today that a teaser for Star Wars: The Force Awakens will run in select theaters over the holiday weekend before heading to all theaters in December.

The post Star Wars: The Force Awakens Trailer Debuts This Weekend appeared first on WIRED.








Categories: Open Source, Technology

Google Chrome Will Block All NPAPI Plugins By Default In January

Slashdot - Mon, 11/24/2014 - 5:19pm
An anonymous reader writes Google today provided an update on its plan to remove Netscape Plugin Application Programming Interface (NPAPI) from Chrome, which the company says will improve the browser's security, speed, and stability, as well as reduce complexity in the code base. In short, the latest timeline is as follows: Block all plugins by default in January 2015, disable support in April 2015, and remove support completely in September 2015. For context, Google first announced in September 2013 that it was planning to drop NPAPI. At the time, Google said anonymous Chrome usage data showed just six NPAPI plugins were used by more than 5 percent of users, and the company was hoping to remove support from Chrome "before the end of 2014, but the exact timing will depend on usage and user feedback."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Open Source, Technology